off the charts
POLICY INSIGHT
BEYOND THE NUMBERS

You are here

Capital Spending to Build and Renovate Schools Also Down

October 26, 2016 at 2:30 PM

State cuts in K-12 funding over the past decade, which we outline in our new report, haven’t just affected schools’ operating funding for things like teacher salaries and textbooks.  Capital spending — to build new schools, renovate and expand facilities, and equip schools with more modern technologies, for example — also fell sharply in most states.

Elementary and secondary schools nationally cut capital spending by $28 billion or 37 percent between fiscal years 2008 and 2014 (the latest year available), after adjusting for inflation.  (See graph.)

 

 

Forty states cut capital spending over this period — in many cases drastically, as the table below shows.  Eight states cut capital spending by more than half.  Nevada, the state with the sharpest reductions, cut capital spending by 86 percent.

 

Change in Capital Spending on Schools, 2008-2014
Adjusted for Inflation
United States -37%
Alabama -35%
Alaska -20%
Arizona -61%
Arkansas -17%
California -41%
Colorado -27%
Connecticut -51%
Delaware -35%
District of Columbia 79%
Florida -78%
Georgia -45%
Hawaii 67%
Idaho -11%
Illinois -29%
Indiana -14%
Iowa 8%
Kansas 64%
Kentucky -26%
Louisiana -18%
Maine -47%
Maryland -24%
Massachusetts 43%
Michigan -43%
Minnesota -14%
Mississippi -24%
Missouri -22%
Montana -22%
Nebraska -37%
Nevada -86%
New Hampshire -51%
New Jersey -50%
New Mexico -10%
New York -23%
North Carolina -68%
North Dakota 147%
Ohio -45%
Oklahoma 36%
Oregon -54%
Pennsylvania -44%
Rhode Island 23%
South Carolina -33%
South Dakota 16%
Tennessee -32%
Texas -36%
Utah -52%
Vermont -38%
Virginia -38%
Washington -23%
West Virginia 4%
Wisconsin 5%
Wyoming -15%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau

SHARE