Tax — Federal Archive

Results per page: 50 | 100

Results by year: 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 - 1991

  • Off the Charts Blog: Increase the EITC
    April 15, 2014

  • Earned Income Tax Credit Promotes Work, Encourages Children’s Success at School, Research Finds
    Chuck MarrChye-Ching Huang, and Arloc Sherman[1]
    Revised April 15, 2014

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which went to 27.9 million low- and moderate-income working families in 2011, provides work, income, educational, and health benefits to its recipients and their children, a substantial body of research shows.  In addition, recent ground-breaking research suggests, the EITC’s …
  • Federal Income Taxes on Middle-Income Families Remain Near Historic Lows
    Chuck Marr and Nathaniel Frentz
    Revised April 15, 2014

    Federal taxes on middle-income Americans are near historic lows,[1] according to the latest available data.  That’s true both for federal income taxes and total federal taxes.[2] Income taxes:  A family of four in the exact middle of the income spectrum filing its taxes for 2013 this filing season paid only 5.3 percent of its 2013 income in …
  • Lone Group Taxed Into Poverty Should Receive a Larger EITC
    Chuck Marr, Nathaniel Frentz, Sharon Parrott, Arloc Sherman, and Chye-Ching Huang
    April 14, 2014

    Policymakers have taken important steps in recent decades to prevent the federal tax code from taxing people into or deeper into poverty.  This bipartisan effort has helped shape various features of the tax code including the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a tax credit for low- and moderate-income working people.  In …
  • Statement by Robert Greenstein, President, on the House Passage of Chairman Ryan's Budget Plan
    Robert Greenstein
    April 11, 2014

    House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s “Path to Prosperity” budget, which the House has now passed, is anything but that for most families and individuals.  Affluent Americans would do quite well, but for tens of millions of others, the Ryan plan — which gets 69 …
  • Ryan Roundup 2014: Everything You Need to Know About Chairman Ryan's Latest Budget
    April 8, 2014

    We’ve compiled CBPP’s analyses and blog posts on House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s budget.  We’ll update this roundup as we issue additional analyses. Analysis: Ryan Block Grant Proposal Would Cut Medicaid by More Than One-Quarter by 2024 and More After That April 4, 2014 “The Medicaid block grant …
  • Tax Foundation Figures Do Not Represent Typical Households' Tax Burdens
    Chuck Marr and Chye-Ching Huang
    April 7, 2014

    The Tax Foundation released its annual “Tax Freedom Day” report today that, once again, can leave a strikingly misleading impression of tax burdens — showing an average federal tax rate across the United States that’s likely higher than the tax rate that 80 percent of U.S. households actually pay. To project the day when “the …
  • Reducing Overpayments in the Earned Income Tax Credit
    Robert Greenstein, John Wancheck, and Chuck Marr
    Revised April 7, 2014

    Both the debate over the minimum wage and the recent 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s War on Poverty have focused more attention on the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for low- and moderate-income workers, which has been shown to increase work, reduce poverty, and lower welfare receipt.[1]  In addition, some …
  • Statement by Robert Greenstein, President, on Chairman Ryan’s Budget Plan
    Robert Greenstein
    April 1, 2014

    Update, April 11: Robert Greenstein has issued a statement on the House passage of the Ryan budget, which includes updated figures. House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s new “Path to Prosperity” is, sadly, anything but that for most Americans.  Affluent Americans would do quite well.  But for tens of millions of others, …
  • Preview of New Ryan Budget: As Extreme as Last Year's, If Not More So
    Sharon Parrott and Joel Friedman
    March 31, 2014

    Basic budget arithmetic suggests that House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s coming budget will be at least as extreme as his budget last year, and likely more so.  The Congressional Budget Office’s (CBO) latest deficit projections are roughly $1 trillion higher over the coming decade than last year’s …
  • Policy Basics: Federal Payroll Taxes
    Updated March 31, 2014

    The federal government levies payroll taxes primarily on wages and self-employment income and uses most of the revenue to fund Social Security, Medicare, and other social insurance benefits.  In fiscal year 2013, federal payroll taxes generated $947 billion, or 34 percent of all federal revenues (see Policy Basics:  Where Do Federal Tax Revenues …
  • Policy Basics: Federal Tax Expenditures
    Updated March 31, 2014

    “Tax expenditures” are subsidies delivered through the tax code as deductions, exclusions, and other tax preferences.  Tax expenditures reduce the amount of tax that households or corporations owe.  To benefit from a tax expenditure, a taxpayer must undertake certain actions or meet certain criteria.  For example, some …
  • Policy Basics: Where Do Federal Tax Revenues Come From?
    Updated March 31, 2014

    In fiscal year 2013, the federal government spent $3.5 trillion on the services it provides, such as national defense, health care programs like Medicare and Medicaid, Social Security benefits for the elderly and disabled, and investments in infrastructure and education, in addition to interest on the debt (see our related Policy Basics: Where Do Our Federal …
  • Policy Basics: Where Do Our Federal Tax Dollars Go?
    Updated March 31, 2014

    The federal government collects taxes to finance various public services. As policymakers and citizens weigh key decisions about revenues and expenditures, it is instructive to examine what the government does with the money it collects. In fiscal year 2013, the federal government spent $3.5 trillion, amounting to 21 percent of the nation’s Gross …
  • Commentary: The EITC Works Very Well – But It’s Not a Safety Net by Itself
    Sharon Parrott
    March 26, 2014

    House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s recent report on safety net programs rightly praised the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for reducing poverty and promoting work.  But, Ryan’s report criticizes much of the rest of the safety net.  And, over the past several years, Chairman Ryan’s budget plans …
  • Testimony of Jared Bernstein Before the House Financial Services Committee: Why Debt Matters
    Jared Bernstein
    March 25, 2014

    Chairman Hensarling and Ranking Member Waters, I very much appreciate the opportunity to testify before you and the committee today on this important and highly germane topic. Key Points There are, of course, many reasons why the debt of the federal government matters, and the following testimony briefly examines these reasons …
  • Strengthening the EITC for Childless Workers Would Promote Work and Reduce Poverty
    Chuck Marr, Chye-Ching Huang, and Nathaniel Frentz[1]
    Updated March 20, 2014

    Policymakers have made substantial progress in recent years in “making work pay” for low-income families with children by strengthening the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credit.  (See the box at the end of this paper.)  But low-income childless workers (childless adults or non-custodial parents) receive …
  • Higher Tobacco Taxes Can Improve Health and Raise Revenue
    Chuck Marr and Chye-Ching Huang[1]
    Updated March 19, 2014

    The President’s proposal to raise the federal excise tax on tobacco products and use the additional revenue to expand preschool education, which he included in both his fiscal year 2014 and 2015 budgets, could achieve the dual goals of reducing the number of premature deaths due to smoking and raising an estimated $78 …
  • Key Elements of the President’s Fiscal Year 2015 Budget
    Joel Friedman, Robert Greenstein and Sharon Parrott
    March 5, 2014

    President Obama’s 2015 budget seeks to strengthen the economic recovery in the near term; reduce deficits and debt as a share of the economy over the medium and long term through higher revenues, program cuts, and comprehensive immigration reform; help low-wage workers by strengthening the Earned Income Tax Credit; and increase …
  • State Fact Sheets: The Earned Income and Child Tax Credits
    March 5, 2014

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) for low- and moderate-income workers encourages and rewards work, offsets federal payroll and income taxes, and raises living standards. The Child Tax Credit (CTC) also helps low-income working families by offsetting part of the cost of child rearing. Next to Social Security, the EITC combined with the refundable …
  • Statement of Robert Greenstein on President Obama’s New Budget
    Robert Greenstein
    March 4, 2014

    President Obama’s new budget is a solid blueprint that would reduce deficits, alleviate poverty, and boost investment in areas needed for future economic growth, such as infrastructure, education, and research.  On the deficit front, the budget confounds the recent predictions of some …
  • What Really Is the Evidence on Taxes and Growth?
    Chye-Ching Huang and Nathaniel Frentz[1]
    February 18, 2014

    A 2012 Tax Foundation report asserted that “nearly every empirical study of taxes and economic growth published in a peer-reviewed academic journal finds that tax increases harm economic growth.”[2]  The report cited 26 studies (19 on the impact of federal or national taxes on national growth and seven on the …
  • Policy Basics: The Child Tax Credit
    Updated January 31, 2014

    Enacted in 1997 and expanded with bipartisan support since 2001, the Child Tax Credit (CTC) helps working families offset the cost of raising children.  It is worth up to $1,000 per eligible child (under age 17 at the end of the tax year). Taxpayers eligible for the credit subtract it from the total amount of federal income taxes they would otherwise owe.…
  • Policy Basics: The Earned Income Tax Credit
    Updated January 31, 2014

    The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a federal tax credit for low- and moderate-income working people.  It encourages and rewards work as well as offsets federal payroll and income taxes.  Twenty-six states, including the District of Columbia, have established their own EITCs to supplement the federal credit. Who Is Eligible, and for How Much? In …
  • States Can Adopt or Expand Earned Income Tax Credits to Build a Stronger Future Economy
    Erica Williams and Michael Leachman
    January 30, 2014

    Half of all states plus the District of Columbia have enacted their own version of the federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) to help working families earning low wages meet basic needs.  State EITCs build on the success of the federal credit by keeping working parents on the job and families and children out of poverty.…
  • Greenstein Testimony Before House Budget Committee on Poverty and the Safety Net
    Robert Greenstein
    January 28, 2014

    I appreciate the invitation to testify today on trends in poverty over the last 50 years, the current state of the safety net, and — most importantly — on some ways that policymakers on both sides of the aisle might work together to make progress going forward. This testimony begins with a review of the data on poverty and income …
  • Commentary: One Anti-Poverty Initiative Both Sides Can Agree On
    Chuck Marr
    January 24, 2014

    While liberals and conservatives differ sharply in assessing the War on Poverty,[1] they seem to agree that we must do more to help low-income childless workers to succeed in the workplace — most likely by strengthening the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), which currently does little for this group.   A number of …
  • Timing Gimmicks Pose Threat to Fiscally Responsible Tax Reform
    Chye-Ching Huang, Chuck Marr, and Nathaniel Frentz[1]
    Updated January 13, 2014

    A key goal of tax reform should be to generate new revenue as part of a balanced deficit-reduction package that replaces sequestration and reduces long-term deficits.[2]  Revenue savings can come from paring back costly and inefficient tax deductions, exclusions, and other tax breaks, known collectively as “tax …
  • Chart Book: The War on Poverty at 50, Section 3
    Arloc Sherman, Sharon Parrott, and Danilo Trisi
    January 7, 2014

    The safety net has developed over many decades and now helps millions of people make ends meet and access affordable health care.  Census data and new research show that the safety net today both keeps tens of millions of people above the poverty line and has positive longer-term impacts on children, including …
  • Commentary: War on Poverty: Large Positive Impact, But More Work Remains
    Sharon Parrott
    January 7, 2014

    President Reagan famously declared, and others have often repeated, that the United States fought a war on poverty and poverty won.  But, as we mark the 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s War on Poverty, we should recognize that poverty has fallen significantly over the last half-century, and other troubling poverty-related conditions have …
  • Chart Book: The War on Poverty at 50, Overview
    Arloc Sherman, Sharon Parrott, and Danilo Trisi
    Updated January 7, 2014

    As we mark the 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s War on Poverty, we should recognize that poverty has fallen significantly over the last half-century when measured using a comprehensive poverty measure, and other troubling poverty-related conditions have declined. Today’s safety net — which includes important programs and improvements …
  • Chart Book: The War on Poverty at 50, Section 1
    Arloc Sherman, Sharon Parrott, and Danilo Trisi
    January 6, 2014

    The following charts illustrate that: An expanded poverty measure shows progress that the official measure masks (Part I); Elderly poverty has fallen substantially under any measure (Part II); The safety net reduces child poverty substantially (Part III); Incomes rose at the bottom (Part IV); and Incomes …
  • Chart Book: The War on Poverty at 50, Section 2
    Arloc Sherman, Sharon Parrott, and Danilo Trisi
    January 6, 2014

    Many changes in American society over the last 50 years have affected poverty.  Some have exerted upward pressure on poverty, such as an increase in the share of economic gains going to top earners, higher rates of single parenthood, and diminished labor market prospects for less-skilled workers.  At the same time, it’s often overlooked that …
  1. Jobs
  2. RSS
  3. Contact Us
 

Sign Up for E-Mail Alerts

RSS Feeds

Multimedia

Browse Reports