Deficit Reduction Deal Without Substantial New Revenues Would Almost Certainly Force Deep Cuts in Housing Assistance

PDF of this report with appendices (38pp.)

By Douglas Rice

November 26, 2012

The figures in Tables 1a and 1b showing the estimated effects of sequestration on housing assistance and community development programs have been updated and posted here: http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3892

Any major legislation to reduce federal budget deficits that does not include substantial new revenues would almost certainly require deep cuts in programs that serve low-income families, including housing and community development programs.  Such cuts would come on top of the ten-year spending cuts that President Obama and Congress enacted last year — and they could be far deeper than the across-the-board cuts (“sequester”) that are scheduled to take effect in early January unless policymakers overturn them.

In last year’s Budget Control Act (BCA), the President and Congress set binding “caps” on total funding (or “budget authority”) for discretionary programs in each fiscal year from 2012 to 2021.[1]   The caps, coming on top of the spending cuts that policymakers enacted in annual appropriations bills beginning in fiscal year 2011, will cut discretionary funding by a total of $1.5 trillion over ten years, thereby shrinking non-defense discretionary spending to its lowest level on record as a share of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in data that go back to 1962.[2]   The caps have already forced substantial reductions in housing and community development assistance (see Figure 2 below), and they will likely put intense pressure on the budget of the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) over the next decade.  If the HUD budget fell in proportion to the BCA caps, that would mean a $2.5 billion annual funding cut by 2021, which is equivalent to eliminating housing voucher assistance for more than 300,000 low-income families, or to reducing funding for the three large block grants — CDBG, HOME, and the Native American Housing Block Grant — by 55 percent.

Policymakers agree, however, that they must do much more than implement these funding caps to address projected long-term deficits and debt.  Consequently, they included in the BCA a mechanism — known as “sequestration” — to compel themselves to agree on further steps to reduce deficits.  Sequestration requires more than $1 trillion in additional spending reductions for defense and non-defense discretionary programs over the decade, beginning with across-the-board cuts in January 2013.  In part because the scheduled cuts are harsh, indiscriminate, and unpopular, the President and Congress will try, in the coming weeks, to hammer out a framework under which to replace these cuts with a more balanced and comprehensive package of spending cuts and tax increases.

To understand what’s at stake for housing assistance and community development programs, consider that policymakers broadly agree that, as part of their deficit reduction efforts, they should largely or entirely avoid cuts in Social Security benefits for current retirees and limit or avoid them for current Medicare beneficiaries.  Also, many lawmakers oppose cutting defense funding below the BCA caps.  If, however, policymakers limit their deficit reduction efforts in this way, then they must achieve the lion’s share of their savings from three remaining major areas of the budget: non-defense discretionary spending — which comprises just one-sixth of spending and has already taken sizeable cuts under the BCA caps — low-income entitlement programs such as Medicaid and SNAP (food stamps) and revenues.

If, then, forthcoming deficit reduction does not include significant new revenues, it almost certainly will force very deep cuts in low-income programs (whether entitlements or low-income programs that are funded through non-defense discretionary spending) — and there is no reason to expect housing assistance and community development programs to avoid such cuts.  Indeed, these cuts could be much deeper than those required under sequestration.

The House-passed budget of Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan illustrates the consequences of a deficit reduction approach that forgoes new revenues.  Under the Ryan budget, non-defense discretionary funding would fall by 24 percent in 2014 and 28 percent by 2021, compared to the 2012 level as adjusted for inflation.  These cuts are more than twice as deep as the cuts required by sequestration, and more than four times as deep as those under the BCA caps (see Figure 1).

The cuts required by the Ryan budget would prove devastating to low-income families and communities.  If all non-defense discretionary programs were cut by the same percentage, as many as 1.2 million households containing low-income seniors, people with disabilities, and families with children would lose federal rental assistance by 2021, and communities would lose more than $1.3 billion in funds for affordable housing and economic development.  (See Tables 1 and 2 of the appendix for state-by-state estimates of the cuts in housing and community development programs under the BCA spending caps, sequestration, and the Ryan budget.)[3]

Congress Has Already Made Deep Cuts in Housing and Community Development Aid

To address projected budget deficits, the President and Congress in recent years have relied almost entirely on cuts to discretionary programs.[4]   First, they enacted funding legislation for fiscal year 2011 that cut discretionary funding below the 2010 level.  Soon thereafter, they enacted the BCA that, as noted above, set ten-year binding “caps” on total budget authority for discretionary programs. 

Figure 2 shows the impact to date on housing assistance and community development programs.  From 2010 to 2012, funding for housing assistance fell by $2.5 billion, or 5.9 percent just in “nominal terms” — i.e., not counting the additional losses due to the effects of inflation — while funds for community development programs fell by $1.5 billion, or 24 percent.[5]   Policymakers cut funds for public housing and housing and community development block grant programs most sharply.

To its credit, Congress mitigated the immediate effect of these cuts on low-income families in two ways.  First, lawmakers targeted a larger share of resources to areas where they are needed to prevent the end of rental assistance to the low-income households that now receive it, such as by renewing Housing Choice vouchers and Section 8 project-based rental assistance (see Figure 2).  Second, lawmakers cut the price tag of HUD’s fiscal 2012 budget by $1.8 billion through one-time savings measures in housing assistance programs — including the rescission of more than $400 million in unused funds and requirements that housing agencies spend down $1.4 billion in funding reserves in lieu of receiving new funding to cover the cost of operating public housing and renewing housing vouchers for low-income families.

While these measures helped to protect low-income families from immediate harm from budget cuts, policymakers for the most part cannot repeat them in future years.  As a result, policymakers would need to allocate significant new funding just to sustain current program service levels.  If policymakers do not do so, HUD and housing agencies will have no choice but to substantially reduce the number of low-income families that they assist.

The BCA Caps Will Continue to Put Great Pressure on Housing and Community Development Programs in Future Years

Under the BCA caps, nominal funding for non-defense discretionary programs will rise modestly from fiscal years 2013 through 2021, but by less than CBO’s projected rate of inflation.  Thus, funding will continue to shrink in real (inflation-adjusted) terms.  (See Figure 1.)

A real cut in non-defense discretionary spending will likely put serious pressure on HUD’s budget over the coming decade, forcing the President and Congress to make tough decisions from a menu of poor options.[6]   By fiscal year 2021, the caps for non-defense discretionary programs fall 6.6 percent below the enacted 2012 funding level, adjusted for inflation.  If HUD’s budget fell proportionally, that would mean a $2.5 billion annual funding cut by 2021, which is equivalent to eliminating housing voucher assistance for more than 300,000 low-income families, or to reducing funding for the three large block grants –CDBG, HOME, and the Native American Housing Block Grant – by 55 percent.

Moreover, these figures probably understate the potential impact on low-income families and communities.  First, they assume that the cost of renewing HUD rental assistance for the more than 4.6 million households that now receive it will grow at the expected general rate of inflation.  These programs rely largely on private market rental housing, however, where rents and utility costs have grown somewhat more than the general inflation rate over the past two decades.  If these trends continue, the number of households losing rental assistance under the funding cuts described above would be greater than these estimates suggest.  If one assumes that rental assistance renewal costs will continue to grow at a rate consistent with recent history, for example, the HUD budget shortfall would grow to $4.5 billion by 2021, which is equivalent to eliminating housing voucher assistance for well over 500,000 low-income families.

Second, no funds would be available to address the roughly $26 billion backlog in capital repairs required to maintain public housing in good condition.  Current funding levels are insufficient to address these needs; indeed, the backlog of capital repair needs will likely grow under current funding levels.  If these repairs are not made, public housing residents — most of whom are elderly or disabled — will have to live in deteriorating conditions, and hundreds of thousands of affordable apartments likely will eventually be lost to disrepair.  Unless policymakers can devise a strategy to address these needs that relies less on appropriated funds, therefore, a large loss of public housing assistance will likely compound the problems outlined above.

Finally, as noted above, one-time savings measures absorbed $1.8 billion in funding cuts in HUD’s 2012 budget, and policymakers for the most part cannot repeat these savings.  If the President and Congress do not provide new funding in future years to offset these one-time funding cuts, then the impact of the BCA caps on low-income families will be much more severe, sharply increasing, for example, the number of families losing rental assistance.[7]  

Four Keys to Sustaining Housing and Community Development Aid Under the BCA Spending Caps

HUD’s budget thus faces serious challenges under the BCA caps, although the outcome is not written in stone.  The pressure on HUD could ease somewhat if rental assistance renewal costs grow at a somewhat lower rate than our analysis assumes.  For instance, no cuts in rental assistance or other programs would be required under our analysis if rental assistance costs grow at a rate that’s somewhat below the projected overall rate of inflation.

In addition, policymakers can, and should, take important steps to avoid deep cuts in assistance for low-income families and communities:

  1. Prioritize low-income programs in making discretionary funding decisions, including by passing a HUD funding bill for fiscal year 2013 that’s modeled on the Senate appropriations bill that covers HUD.  The Senate HUD funding bill, which the Senate Appropriations Committee approved in April, has weaknesses, but it also has many strengths and it improves on the President’s budget request.  Senate appropriators wrote the bill within a framework that adheres to the BCA caps, prioritizes scarce resources to avert cuts in the number of families receiving rental assistance, provides modest funding increases for other priorities such as assistance for homeless individuals and families, and avoids one-time budget savings or gimmicks that would exacerbate the budget challenge in future years.[8]
  2. Pass comprehensive rental assistance reform legislation, such as the Affordable Housing and Self-Sufficiency Act (AHSSIA). This legislation, the most recent version of which was circulated in April by the House Financial Services Committee’s Republican leadership, would streamline the major rental assistance programs, cut the costs of operating these programs, and encourage housing agencies to serve more families within available funds.[9]   The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) estimates that, when fully implemented, AHSSIA would reduce funding needs for HUD rental assistance programs by some $700 million per year, not counting additional savings associated with reduced administrative burdens for housing authorities and private owners.  In light of the likely gap between HUD funding under the BCA caps and rental assistance renewal costs outlined above, savings of this magnitude would help mitigate the impact of funding cuts on low-income families.
  3. Embrace public housing reforms that enable agencies to access more private capital to meet capital repair needs.  The Obama Administration has proposed to let housing agencies convert public housing properties to “project-based” rental assistance contracts, and Congress approved a limited demonstration of the concept in the 2012 appropriations law.  Project-based rental assistance contracts would make it easier for housing agencies to raise private capital to rehabilitate developments and preserve affordable rental housing for the long term.  The Administration and Congress should make this option available to more housing agencies by adopting AHSSIA’s expanded demonstration.
  4. Prevent further cuts in funding for non-defense discretionary programs by adopting a balanced approach to addressing the nation’s remaining fiscal challenges.  See the discussion below.

Sequestration Would Cause Hundreds of Thousands of Low-Income Families to Lose Rental Aid, But Alternatives that Lack Substantial New Revenues Would Force Even Deeper Cuts

Along with setting ten-year caps on discretionary spending, the BCA created a Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the “supercommittee”) to develop legislation to reduce deficits by another $1.2 trillion over ten years, and it created a backup mechanism of annual spending cuts, known as “sequestration,” that would take effect if the supercommittee failed to meet its charge.  Because the supercommittee failed, sequestration is scheduled to occur starting in January 2013 and to run through 2021.

Sequestration requires cuts in non-defense discretionary funding in each fiscal year from 2013 to 2021 below the BCA spending caps.[10]   Figure 1 shows the effects of these cuts, compared to the cuts under the BCA caps.  The first round of sequestration cuts, in January 2013, will apply to every non-exempt program, including nearly every discretionary housing and community development program.  (In fiscal years 2014 to 2021, the funding cuts will not occur on an across-the-board basis; that is, the Administration and Congress will have the power to distribute the funding cuts however they wish by making the cuts when they write the annual appropriations bills for these years.)

The Office of Management and Budget recently released estimates showing that funding for non-defense discretionary programs would fall by 8.2 percent under sequestration in January 2013.   Table 1 in the appendix shows the estimated effects of a 2013 sequester on housing and community development programs in each state, which would be harsh.  For instance, states would lose Housing Choice vouchers for up to 180,000 low-income families, and funding for the three major block grants would fall by $375 million — on top of the $1.9 billion in cuts that policymakers have enacted since 2010.  These cuts would grow larger in subsequent years, unless policymakers acted to prevent sequestration from continuing.

Sequestration’s harsh and indiscriminate effects have received much attention, and policymakers face great pressure to prevent it from occurring.  If policymakers do so, however, they likely will couple this action with an agreement to cut projected deficits by much more than sequestration would achieve.

Without Revenues, Any Plan to Replace Sequestration Will Force as Deep --- Or Deeper ---Cuts Than Sequestration Itself

Policymakers need to achieve about $2 trillion in additional deficit reduction, on top of that achieved through the BCA caps (for a total of nearly $4 trillion including the BCA savings) in order to “stabilize” the federal debt over the next decade so it does not continue to grow as a share of the economy and, thus, risk serious financial and economic problems.[11]   Moreover, as noted above, many policymakers argue that Social Security, Medicare, and defense should contribute little (or nothing) to the effort.  If policymakers largely avoid those spending categories, they will need to include very substantial new revenues in their deficit reduction package to prevent very deep cuts to low-income programs, including housing and community development assistance.

The House-passed Ryan budget illustrates the point.  It includes no new revenues and would impose a massive $5.3 trillion in spending cuts that over ten years.  These cuts include severe cuts in non-defense discretionary programs, as well as in Medicaid and food stamps.[12]  

Under the Ryan budget, funding for non-defense discretionary programs would fall by 24 percent in 2014 and 28 percent by 2021, compared to the 2012 level as adjusted for inflation.  These cuts are more than twice as deep as the cuts that sequestration would require and more than four times as deep as those the BCA caps require (see Figure 2).

Such cuts would almost certainly prove devastating to low-income families in every state, as Table 2 in the Appendix indicates.  We estimate, for example, that if all non-defense discretionary programs were reduced by the same percentage, up to 1.2 million low-income families would lose rental assistance by 2021 under the Ryan plan, and communities would lose $1.3 billion for affordable housing and community development and $539 million for homeless assistance.  These very deep cuts would come at a time when the number of poor households (particularly families with children) struggling to afford housing and avoid homelessness has been rising markedly.  For instance, the latest American Housing Survey reveals that the number of poor renter households paying housing costs of more than 50 percent of their income — a housing cost burden that’s associated with increased risks of homelessness — has risen by 14 percent over the past two years.[13]

Conclusion

Bipartisan deficit reduction commissions — including the Bowles-Simpson commission — have supported the principle that deficit reduction should be crafted so the most vulnerable Americans aren’t made to bear greater hardships than they already do.  An important part of sustaining the safety net for individuals and families is preventing further cuts to housing assistance and community development programs.

The risk of sequestration has received much attention in recent months.  But the greater risk to housing assistance, community development, and other low-income programs lies in the decisions that the President and Congress will make about how to replace sequestration with a long-term deficit reduction package.  Policymakers can avoid even deeper cuts in housing assistance and community development programs than the Budget Control Act makes likely — and preserve more of this critical part of the safety net — only through a balanced approach that includes significant new revenues.

Appendix I: Methods and Sources

Last September, the White House Office of Management and Budget released OMB Sequestration Report Pursuant to the Sequestration Transparency Act of 2012, which provided estimates of the funding reductions required in January 2013 under sequestration for each affected program.  We used OMB’s estimates to calculate the potential funding reductions in each state.  Our calculations, the results of which are shown in Tables 1a and 1b, assume that state shares of total program funding in 2013 will equal those in 2012.  For public housing, state allocations in 2012 were estimated from actual allocations of capital and operating funds in 2011, as reported in Tables 18-28 and 18-30 of Analytical Perspectives, Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2013.  For all other programs, actual 2012 allocations were used, as reported by HUD.  For HOPWA, state funding figures are FY 2012 formula allocations; competitive grant awards for FY 2012 would also be reduced under sequestration, but are not included here.  Funding figures for Homeless Assistance combine ESG formula allocations for FY 2012 and competitive CoC grants for FY 2011.  OMB estimates that funding for Housing Choice Vouchers will be cut by $1.5 billion under sequestration.  To estimate the number of families losing voucher assistance under sequestration, each state’s share of the funding cut was assumed to be in proportion to its share of housing assistance payments in 2012, as reported to HUD’s Voucher Management System (VMS).  To calculate the number of families potentially affected, the estimated funding cut for each state was divided by the projected average per-voucher cost in that state in 2013, which was also derived from VMS data.    

Potential cuts in funding and families served in 2014 and 2021 under the Budget Control Act (BCA) spending caps, sequestration, and the House (Ryan) budget were estimated as follows.  The BCA establishes discretionary spending caps in each fiscal year from 2012 to 2021, including separate caps for defense and non-defense programs.  Under sequestration, the BCA spending caps for non-defense discretionary programs would be replaced by a series of reduced caps.  The House (Ryan) budget also specifies spending limits for non-defense discretionary programs over the same period. 

To estimate the impact of the BCA spending caps on non-defense discretionary funding in 2014 and 2021, we compared the caps to the 2012 funding level, adjusted for inflation; the source for the latter was the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) baseline for such programs released in March 2012.  Potential cuts under sequestration and the Ryan budget were also estimated in comparison to the CBO March 2012 baseline.  These comparisons yielded estimates of the percentage cut in each year under each scenario, which formed the basis of Figure 1 and the figures in Tables 2a – 2g.

To estimate the potential impact of each budget scenario on the HUD budget, we performed two sets of calculations.  In the first, we constructed a HUD baseline based on the enacted budget for fiscal year 2012 (net budget authority); figures for fiscal years 2013 to 2021 were then derived using the inflators implicit in the CBO March 2012 baseline for non-defense discretionary programs.  Comparisons between the HUD baseline and potential HUD budgets under each of the three scenarios, in which it was assumed that HUD funding would be reduced by the same percentage as funding for non-defense discretionary programs overall, formed the basis of certain figures cited in the report, e.g., that HUD funding would be reduced by $2.5 billion (in 2012 dollars) by 2021 under the BCA spending caps.  The resulting percentage cuts to the HUD budget under each scenario were also applied to calculate funding reductions at the program level, under the simplifying assumption that each program would cut by the same percentage as the HUD budget overall.  These calculations are the basis of the estimates provided in Tables 2a – 2g.

To estimate potential reductions in the number of families using Housing Choice vouchers, we divided the estimated funding cuts by projected per-voucher costs in each state in 2014 and 2021.  For these estimates, we assumed that per-voucher costs would grow at the same rate as the CBO baseline.  In effect, we assumed that state and local housing agencies would absorb funding reductions entirely by reducing the number of families receiving housing vouchers.  When faced with budget shortfalls, housing agencies may take steps to reduce costs that do not require reducing the number of families assisted.  However, most such steps — such as reducing payment standards (that is, reducing the maximum amount of voucher subsidy available to families, thereby requiring them either to pay more out-of-pocket or to move to a lower-cost apartment, if available) — also increase hardships for low-income families.  More importantly, such steps are likely to result in limited savings over the longer term, making significant reductions in the number of families served unavoidable.

For public housing and Section 8 project-based rental assistance, it is more difficult to predict the impact of funding cuts with precision.  In the short run, funding reductions will not necessarily result in increased hardships for low-income residents or in fewer families being served.  Over the long term, however, such consequences are unavoidable.  Accordingly, we did not attempt to estimate the number of affordable housing units that would be lost under budget reduction scenarios in 2013 or 2014, but did make such estimates for 2021 (see Table 2c).  For the Section 8 project-based rental assistance (PBRA) program, we assumed that the number of assisted units that would be lost in 2021 was proportional to the percentage reduction in funding, e.g., under the House (Ryan) budget plan.  If HUD has insufficient funds to cover PBRA rental assistance contracts, then it will be forced either to reduce payment amounts to owners or to stop payment on some share of PBRA contracts.  We assume that few owners would accept reduced payments, and owners who are no longer receiving any assistance payments would either raise tenant rents or evict formerly-assisted tenants.  The results, shown in Table 2c, are conservative, as the calculations assume that per-unit PBRA costs will grow at the CBO inflation rate, rather than, for instance, at a rate consistent with recent program and market cost trends.

For public housing, we also assumed that the number of housing units lost in 2021 would be in proportion to the real percentage cut in funding.  In this case, the estimates probably overstate the impact in 2021, as some housing agencies would continue to fill available units, at least over the short term, even if operating and capital funds were severely inadequate.  Over the longer term, however, agencies would be unable to maintain the units in adequate condition, so the primary uncertainty is not the magnitude of the potential loss of units, but the timing of those losses.

The report offers a second set of estimates of the potential impacts on the HUD budget under more realistic cost assumptions for Housing Choice Voucher renewals, the public housing Operating Fund, and the Section 8 project-based rental assistance program.  In recent years, per-unit costs in the Section 8 programs have roughly followed the path of the Consumer Price Indices for residential rents and utilities, which, over the past two decades, have grown at a rate about 0.5 percent higher than the general rate of inflation (CPI-U).  In this set of calculations, we assumed accordingly that per-unit costs in the two Section 8 programs would grow at the CPI-U rate plus 0.5 percent from 2013 to 2021, using CPI-U projections recently published by CBO.  In addition, we assumed that Housing Choice voucher renewal costs would grow an additional 1 percent per year due to the issuance of new “tenant protection” vouchers every year to replace public and private assisted housing that is no longer available.  For public housing, we modeled operating costs based on HUD data released with the FY 2013 budget request and inflation factors relevant to the operating funding formula.  We also assumed a 1 percent reduction per year in the number of assisted units, which is consistent with recent trends, and offsets in part the 1 percent increase per year for tenant protection vouchers described above.  (Note that we assumed no similar offset in the Section 8 project-based rental assistance program, as losses of assisted units, e.g., due to owners exiting the program, are generally offset by an increase in the number of renewal units due to the expiration of original multiyear assistance contracts.)  Using these assumptions, we calculated that the HUD budget shortfall would grow to $4.5 billion by 2021 under the BCA spending caps, as cited in the report.

Appendix II: Estimates of State Impacts Under Various Budget Scenarios

This appendix includes two sets of tables showing estimates of state-by-state impacts of various budget scenarios in 2013, 2014, and 2021.  The first set (Tables 1a and 1b) show estimates of the effects of sequestration in 2013 on various housing and community development programs.  These estimates are based on those released by the White House Office of Management and Budget in September.

The second set includes CBPP estimates of the effects of the BCA spending caps, sequestration, and the House (Ryan) budget in 2014 and 2021.  Table 2a shows estimates of the impact on the number of families served by the Housing Choice Voucher program.  Tables 2b, 2d, 2e, 2f, and 2g show the estimated dollar impacts on public housing, HOME, homeless assistance grants, Native American Housing Block Grant, and CDBG formula grant programs, respectively.  Table 2c provides estimates of the number of households that could lose assistance in 2021 from public housing and the Section 8 project-based rental assistance programs under the BCA caps, sequestration, and the House (Ryan) budget.

The methods and sources used in creating these tables are explained in Appendix I.

Table 1a
Cuts in Housing and Community Development Block Grant Funding Due to Sequestration, 2013
State CDBG Formula Grants HOME Native American
Housing Grants
2012 Actual 2013
Estimated sequestration cut
2012 Actual 2013
Estimated sequestration cut
2012 Actual 2013
Estimated sequestration cut
Alabama $39,246,037 -$3,212,198 $13,800,040 -$1,126,890 $2,015,847 -$162,463
Alaska $3,843,406 -$314,574 $3,628,693 -$296,313 $99,308,089 -$8,003,538
Arizona $46,405,177 -$3,798,157 $15,226,793 -$1,243,396 $74,169,100 -$5,977,511
Arkansas $23,433,880 -$1,918,009 $9,179,710 -$749,601 $0 $0
California $351,573,471 -$28,775,482 $131,050,655 -$10,701,390 $45,859,761 -$3,695,976
Colorado $32,933,094 -$2,695,498 $12,988,108 -$1,060,588 $1,838,640 -$148,182
Connecticut $34,325,990 -$2,809,504 $11,467,021 -$936,379 $76,464 -$6,162
Delaware $6,233,818 -$510,224 $4,142,103 -$338,238 $0 $0
District of Columbia $13,904,983 -$1,138,091 $4,343,097 -$354,650 $0 $0
Florida $123,354,155 -$10,096,255 $47,858,026 -$3,908,011 $1,422,479 -$114,642
Georgia $72,331,774 -$5,920,190 $25,827,065 -$2,108,998 $0 $0
Hawaii $12,204,143 -$998,881 $5,571,482 -$454,958 $0 $0
Idaho $10,660,286 -$872,520 $3,976,218 -$324,692 $4,870,883 -$392,559
Illinois $146,421,200 -$11,984,239 $43,593,785 -$3,559,800 $0 $0
Indiana $59,842,592 -$4,897,979 $19,506,227 -$1,592,848 $1,062,156 -$85,602
Iowa $32,857,042 -$2,689,274 $8,817,328 -$720,009 $1,432,152 -$115,421
Kansas $23,399,317 -$1,915,180 $8,114,471 -$662,615 $1,428,692 -$115,143
Kentucky $38,294,674 -$3,134,331 $14,055,736 -$1,147,769 $0 $0
Louisiana $45,354,000 -$3,712,121 $14,605,721 -$1,192,680 $588,408 -$47,422
Maine $16,106,214 -$1,318,257 $4,708,728 -$384,507 $3,926,247 -$316,428
Massachusetts $42,440,741 -$3,473,677 $12,899,979 -$1,053,392 $0 $0
Maryland $88,974,486 -$7,282,358 $25,171,557 -$2,055,470 $1,128,094 -$90,916
Michigan $111,620,816 -$9,135,908 $30,838,799 -$2,518,248 $12,839,502 -$1,034,774
Minnesota $47,038,219 -$3,849,970 $13,486,827 -$1,101,313 $17,853,406 -$1,438,860
Mississippi $27,513,192 -$2,251,892 $9,472,960 -$773,547 $3,030,375 -$244,227
Missouri $56,650,547 -$4,636,717 $18,430,106 -$1,504,973 $281,587 -$22,694
Montana $7,347,866 -$601,406 $3,890,397 -$317,684 $29,241,598 -$2,356,668
Nebraska $16,398,847 -$1,342,208 $5,583,112 -$455,908 $7,946,793 -$640,456
Nevada $17,633,337 -$1,443,248 $8,515,508 -$695,363 $14,757,408 -$1,189,344
New Hampshire $10,831,576 -$886,540 $3,782,193 -$308,848 $0 $0
New Jersey $77,708,633 -$6,360,273 $25,676,951 -$2,096,739 $0 $0
New Mexico $14,165,369 -$1,159,403 $5,682,237 -$464,003 $74,063,814 -$5,969,026
New York $281,664,304 -$23,053,577 $100,863,556 -$8,236,359 $6,182,289 -$498,249
North Carolina $65,385,998 -$5,351,694 $25,894,752 -$2,114,525 $17,695,091 -$1,426,101
North Dakota $4,925,059 -$403,105 $3,421,865 -$279,424 $11,296,724 -$910,437
Ohio $135,321,183 -$11,075,728 $40,793,446 -$3,331,129 $0 $0
Oklahoma $24,942,864 -$2,041,516 $11,137,072 -$909,436 $95,468,551 -$7,694,098
Oregon $30,258,808 -$2,476,614 $12,885,177 -$1,052,183 $17,026,758 -$1,372,238
Pennsylvania $167,973,974 -$13,748,284 $42,358,448 -$3,458,924 $0 $0
Rhode Island $14,662,008 -$1,200,052 $5,113,794 -$417,584 $561,831 -$45,280
South Carolina $32,602,287 -$2,668,422 $12,019,586 -$981,500 $1,254,641 -$101,115
South Dakota $6,552,541 -$536,310 $3,373,459 -$275,471 $33,118,200 -$2,669,095
Tennessee $44,563,668 -$3,647,434 $18,163,195 -$1,483,178 $168,354 -$13,568
Texas $215,435,097 -$17,632,868 $67,626,569 -$5,522,279 $1,578,424 -$127,210
Utah $18,142,062 -$1,484,886 $6,312,640 -$515,480 $12,617,777 -$1,016,905
Vermont $6,837,137 -$559,604 $3,340,710 -$272,797 $0 $0
Virginia $48,666,534 -$3,983,244 $18,940,130 -$1,546,621 $0 $0
Washington $48,830,368 -$3,996,654 $19,806,562 -$1,617,373 $36,696,288 -$2,957,464
West Virginia $19,137,316 -$1,566,345 $6,436,376 -$525,584 $0 $0
Wisconsin $54,535,888 -$4,463,637 $18,234,014 -$1,488,961 $21,094,136 -$1,700,040
Wyoming $3,196,119 -$261,595 $3,500,000 -$285,804 $3,724,721 -$300,186
U.S. Territories $73,983,925 -$6,055,415 $18,069,960 -$1,475,565 $0 $0
Total $2.95 billion $241 million $1 billion $82 million $658 million -$53 million

 

Table 1b:
Cuts in Federal Rental Assistance Due to Sequestration, 2013
State Housing Choice Vouchers Public Housing Homeless Assistance HOPWA
2012
Number of families assisted
2013
Estimated number of families cut under sequestration
2012
Estimated
funding
2013
Estimated funding cut under sequestration
2012
Actual
funding
2013
Estimated funding cut under sequestration
2012
Actual
funding
2013
Estimated funding cut under sequestration
Alabama 29,054 -2,428 $192,314,645 -$15,782,265 $22,258,870 -$1,771,307 $2,001,172 -$164,096
Alaska 4,185 -350 $12,643,027 -$1,037,548 $3,954,161 -$314,662 $0 $0
Arizona 20,763 -1,735 $30,013,500 -$2,463,052 $39,593,590 -$3,150,761 $2,498,250 -$204,857
Arkansas 20,979 -1,753 $50,092,324 -$4,110,817 $8,492,503 -$675,813 $863,949 -$70,844
California 306,341 -25,602 $204,663,891 -$16,795,704 $310,151,984 -$24,681,139 $39,343,180 -$3,226,141
Colorado 29,571 -2,471 $30,077,819 -$2,468,331 $23,129,181 -$1,840,564 $2,000,579 -$164,047
Connecticut 33,767 -2,822 $82,070,160 -$6,735,072 $35,567,628 -$2,830,385 $3,228,628 -$264,747
Delaware 4,377 -366 $15,508,699 -$1,272,718 $6,030,395 -$479,884 $843,369 -$69,156
District of Columbia 10,212 -853 $57,769,751 -$4,740,864 $21,953,527 -$1,747,008 $13,623,582 -$1,117,134
Florida 92,937 -7,767 $177,928,052 -$14,601,632 $91,233,624 -$7,260,149 $39,830,359 -$3,266,089
Georgia 52,148 -4,358 $211,280,924 -$17,338,729 $39,903,382 -$3,175,414 $11,003,662 -$902,300
Hawaii 9,021 -754 $29,090,436 -$2,387,301 $12,776,088 -$1,016,690 $654,789 -$53,693
Idaho 6,772 -566 $1,944,346 -$159,562 $4,730,200 -$376,418 $0 $0
Illinois 79,355 -6,632 $243,710,732 -$20,000,075 $104,140,457 -$8,287,244 $7,446,663 -$610,626
Indiana 35,952 -3,005 $51,090,137 -$4,192,703 $25,441,219 -$2,024,550 $1,875,715 -$153,809
Iowa 21,122 -1,765 $10,709,981 -$878,913 $11,664,367 -$928,222 $409,416 -$33,572
Kansas 11,136 -931 $43,026,796 -$3,530,986 $10,486,035 -$834,453 $386,858 -$31,722
Kentucky 31,328 -2,618 $88,621,136 -$7,272,677 $21,975,020 -$1,748,719 $1,068,558 -$87,622
Louisiana 45,385 -3,793 $102,280,230 -$8,393,608 $33,035,205 -$2,628,861 $7,403,964 -$607,125
Maine 12,145 -1,015 $122,948,354 -$10,089,734 $12,100,762 -$962,949 $0 $0
Maryland 42,161 -3,524 $125,999,160 -$10,340,097 $51,896,356 -$4,129,786 $10,155,324 -$832,737
Massachusetts 75,182 -6,283 $190,278,167 -$15,615,142 $73,205,748 -$5,825,535 $4,024,706 -$330,026
Michigan 51,599 -4,312 $88,201,324 -$7,238,225 $74,116,802 -$5,898,034 $3,770,636 -$309,192
Minnesota 30,954 -2,587 $73,420,995 -$6,025,280 $28,506,049 -$2,268,442 $1,162,156 -$95,297
Mississippi 21,642 -1,809 $53,353,470 -$4,378,443 $8,438,499 -$671,515 $2,125,613 -$174,300
Missouri 38,807 -3,243 $65,007,376 -$5,334,818 $32,588,611 -$2,593,322 $3,043,016 -$249,527
Montana 5,526 -462 $10,224,981 -$839,111 $3,465,582 -$275,783 $0 $0
Nebraska 11,537 -964 $22,988,823 -$1,886,573 $7,362,608 -$585,898 $358,165 -$29,370
Nevada 13,699 -1,145 $19,424,335 -$1,594,054 $10,618,372 -$844,984 $1,377,451 -$112,951
New Hampshire 9,284 -776 $14,583,896 -$1,196,825 $7,093,149 -$564,456 $0 $0
New Jersey 64,014 -5,350 $210,842,860 -$17,302,780 $46,478,310 -$3,698,631 $15,002,866 -$1,230,235
New Mexico 12,237 -1,023 $16,043,242 -$1,316,586 $10,374,008 -$825,538 $608,287 -$49,880
New York 222,794 -18,620 $1,213,291,672 -$99,568,553 $215,706,769 -$17,165,419 $60,548,848 -$4,965,006
North Carolina 54,978 -4,595 $182,272,191 -$14,958,133 $28,258,057 -$2,248,707 $4,262,603 -$349,533
North Dakota 6,720 -562 $5,062,947 -$415,490 $2,476,415 -$197,067 $0 $0
Ohio 91,563 -7,652 $258,699,664 -$21,230,139 $92,250,086 -$7,341,037 $3,708,886 -$304,129
Oklahoma 22,943 -1,917 $47,102,360 -$3,865,446 $9,370,546 -$745,685 $1,114,664 -$91,402
Oregon 31,986 -2,673 $24,724,567 -$2,029,017 $23,137,403 -$1,841,218 $1,469,070 -$120,464
Pennsylvania 74,813 -6,252 $377,768,888 -$31,001,533 $102,571,574 -$8,162,396 $10,373,339 -$850,614
Rhode Island 9,042 -756 $42,392,298 -$3,478,916 $7,317,618 -$582,318 $877,009 -$71,915
South Carolina 23,782 -1,988 $68,905,628 -$5,654,727 $12,439,653 -$989,917 $3,916,073 -$321,118
South Dakota 5,657 -473 $4,144,229 -$340,095 $2,261,057 -$179,929 $0 $0
Tennessee 33,007 -2,759 $149,794,579 -$12,292,864 $23,681,494 -$1,884,516 $3,553,468 -$291,384
Texas 148,047 -12,373 $243,177,927 -$19,956,351 $95,230,049 -$7,578,175 $18,050,218 -$1,480,118
Utah 10,297 -861 $7,022,069 -$576,265 $8,956,073 -$712,702 $516,074 -$42,318
Vermont 6,030 -504 $6,795,214 -$557,648 $4,350,369 -$346,192 $0 $0
Virginia 44,050 -3,681 $96,232,506 -$7,897,303 $27,806,301 -$2,212,758 $2,681,436 -$219,878
Washington 48,483 -4,040 $63,009,141 -$5,170,833 $45,638,519 -$3,631,802   $2,542,971 -$208,524
West Virginia 13,279 -1,110 $24,465,553 -$2,007,761 $8,027,256 -$638,789 $339,564 -$27,844
Wisconsin 26,511 -2,216 $34,605,354 -$2,839,882 $28,388,100 -$2,259,056 $1,042,438 -$85,480
Wyoming 2,306 -193 $2,441,514 -$200,362 $669,908 -$53,310 $0 $0
U.S. Territories 32,791 -2,740 $336,788,131 -$27,638,455 $29,052,039 -$2,311,890 $7,692,426 -$630,779
Total 2,142,134 -179,025  $5.8 billion  $479 million $1.96 billion  $156 million $298,800,000 -$24,501,600

 

Table 2a:
Estimated Cuts in Housing Choice Vouchers under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State 2012
Number of Families Assisted
2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama 29,054 -827 -2,896 -7,047 -1,921 -3,407 -7,993
Alaska 4,185 -119 -417 -1,015 -277 -491 -1,151
Arizona 20,763 -591 -2,069 -5,036 -1,373 -2,435 -5,712
Arkansas 20,979 -597 -2,091 -5,089 -1,387 -2,460 -5,771
California 306,341 -8,722 -30,531 -74,306 -20,256 -35,920 -84,272
Colorado 29,571 -842 -2,947 -7,173 -1,955 -3,467 -8,135
Connecticut 33,767 -961 -3,365 -8,190 -2,233 -3,959 -9,289
Delaware 4,377 -125 -436 -1,062 -289 -513 -1,204
District of Columbia 10,212 -291 -1,018 -2,477 -675 -1,197 -2,809
Florida 92,937 -2,646 -9,262 -22,543 -6,145 -10,897 -25,566
Georgia 52,148 -1,485 -5,197 -12,649 -3,448 -6,115 -14,346
Hawaii 9,021 -257 -899 -2,188 -596 -1,058 -2,482
Idaho 6,772 -193 -675 -1,643 -448 -794 -1,863
Illinois 79,355 -2,259 -7,909 -19,248 -5,247 -9,305 -21,830
Indiana 35,952 -1,024 -3,583 -8,721 -2,377 -4,216 -9,890
Iowa 21,122 -601 -2,105 -5,123 -1,397 -2,477 -5,811
Kansas 11,136 -317 -1,110 -2,701 -736 -1,306 -3,063
Kentucky 31,328 -892 -3,122 -7,599 -2,071 -3,673 -8,618
Louisiana 45,385 -1,292 -4,523 -11,009 -3,001 -5,322 -12,485
Maine 12,145 -346 -1,210 -2,946 -803 -1,424 -3,341
Maryland 42,161 -1,200 -4,202 -10,227 -2,788 -4,944 -11,598
Massachusetts 75,182 -2,141 -7,493 -18,236 -4,971 -8,815 -20,682
Michigan 51,599 -1,469 -5,142 -12,516 -3,412 -6,050 -14,194
Minnesota 30,954 -881 -3,085 -7,508 -2,047 -3,630 -8,515
Mississippi 21,642 -616 -2,157 -5,250 -1,431 -2,538 -5,954
Missouri 38,807 -1,105 -3,868 -9,413 -2,566 -4,550 -10,676
Montana 5,526 -157 -551 -1,340 -365 -648 -1,520
Nebraska 11,537 -328 -1,150 -2,798 -763 -1,353 -3,174
Nevada 13,699 -390 -1,365 -3,323 -906 -1,606 -3,769
New Hampshire 9,284 -264 -925 -2,252 -614 -1,089 -2,554
New Jersey 64,014 -1,823 -6,380 -15,527 -4,233 -7,506 -17,610
New Mexico 12,237 -348 -1,220 -2,968 -809 -1,435 -3,366
New York 222,794 -6,343 -22,204 -54,041 -14,732 -26,124 -61,289
North Carolina 54,978 -1,565 -5,479 -13,336 -3,635 -6,447 -15,124
North Dakota 6,720 -191 -670 -1,630 -444 -788 -1,849
Ohio 91,563 -2,607 -9,125 -22,209 -6,054 -10,736 -25,188
Oklahoma 22,943 -653 -2,287 -5,565 -1,517 -2,690 -6,311
Oregon 31,986 -911 -3,188 -7,759 -2,115 -3,751 -8,799
Pennsylvania 74,813 -2,130 -7,456 -18,147 -4,947 -8,772 -20,581
Rhode Island 9,042 -257 -901 -2,193 -598 -1,060 -2,487
South Carolina 23,782 -677 -2,370 -5,769 -1,573 -2,789 -6,542
South Dakota 5,657 -161 -564 -1,372 -374 -663 -1,556
Tennessee 33,007 -940 -3,290 -8,006 -2,183 -3,870 -9,080
Texas 148,047 -4,215 -14,755 -35,910 -9,789 -17,359 -40,727
Utah 10,297 -293 -1,026 -2,498 -681 -1,207 -2,833
Vermont 6,030 -172 -601 -1,463 -399 -707 -1,659
Virginia 44,050 -1,254 -4,390 -10,685 -2,913 -5,165 -12,118
Washington 48,343 -1,376 -4,818 -11,726 -3,197 -5,668 -13,299
West Virginia 13,279 -378 -1,323 -3,221 -878 -1,557 -3,653
Wisconsin 26,511 -755 -2,642 -6,431 -1,753 -3,109 -7,293
Wyoming 2,306 -66 -230 -559 -152 -270 -634
U.S. Territories 32,791 -934 -3,268 -7,954 -2,168 -3,845 -9,021
Total 2,142,134 -60,990 -213,490 -519,597 -141,644 -251,177 -589,285

 

Table 2b:
Estimated Cuts in Public Housing under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State 2012 actual 2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama $192,314,645 -$5,475,493 -$19,166,556 -$46,647,962 -$12,716,411 -$22,549,991 -$52,904,314
Alaska $12,643,027 -$359,966 -$1,260,036 -$3,066,701 -$835,994 -$1,482,467 -$3,478,002
Arizona $30,013,500 -$854,530 -$2,991,220 -$7,280,093 -$1,984,581 -$3,519,254 -$8,256,488
Arkansas $50,092,324 -$1,426,205 -$4,992,326 -$12,150,426 -$3,312,252 -$5,873,611 -$13,780,022
California $204,663,891 -$5,827,095 -$20,397,312 -$49,643,402 -$13,532,980 -$23,998,011 -$56,301,499
Colorado $30,077,819 -$856,362 -$2,997,630 -$7,295,695 -$1,988,834 -$3,526,796 -$8,274,182
Connecticut $82,070,160 -$2,336,663 -$8,179,316 -$19,906,990 -$5,426,721 -$9,623,195 -$22,576,884
Delaware $15,508,699 -$441,556 -$1,545,635 -$3,761,800 -$1,025,481 -$1,818,484 -$4,266,327
District of Columbia $57,769,751 -$1,644,793 -$5,757,477 -$14,012,667 -$3,819,906 -$6,773,833 -$15,892,024
Florida $177,928,052 -$5,065,885 -$17,732,752 -$43,158,340 -$11,765,127 -$20,863,081 -$48,946,670
Georgia $211,280,924 -$6,015,492 -$21,056,782 -$51,248,434 -$13,970,517 -$24,773,896 -$58,121,795
Hawaii $29,090,436 -$828,249 -$2,899,225 -$7,056,194 -$1,923,545 -$3,411,020 -$8,002,560
Idaho $1,944,346 -$55,359 -$193,778 -$471,622 -$128,566 -$227,986 -$534,875
Illinois $243,710,732 -$6,938,819 -$24,288,818 -$59,114,629 -$16,114,872 -$28,576,476 -$67,042,991
Indiana $51,090,137 -$1,454,615 -$5,091,770 -$12,392,456 -$3,378,230 -$5,990,611 -$14,054,513
Iowa $10,709,981 -$304,930 -$1,067,383 -$2,597,820 -$708,175 -$1,255,806 -$2,946,235
Kansas $43,026,796 -$1,225,039 -$4,288,157 -$10,436,607 -$2,845,059 -$5,045,138 -$11,836,348
Kentucky $88,621,136 -$2,523,180 -$8,832,203 -$21,495,999 -$5,859,891 -$10,391,335 -$24,379,009
Louisiana $102,280,230 -$2,912,075 -$10,193,502 -$24,809,157 -$6,763,070 -$11,992,941 -$28,136,523
Maine $122,948,354 -$3,500,528 -$12,253,339 -$29,822,430 -$8,129,708 -$14,416,397 -$33,822,168
Maryland $125,999,160 -$3,587,390 -$12,557,390 -$30,562,436 -$8,331,436 -$14,774,122 -$34,661,422
Massachusetts $190,278,167 -$5,417,511 -$18,963,595 -$46,153,992 -$12,581,753 -$22,311,203 -$52,344,094
Michigan $88,201,324 -$2,511,227 -$8,790,363 -$21,394,169 -$5,832,132 -$10,342,109 -$24,263,522
Minnesota $73,420,995 -$2,090,408 -$7,317,319 -$17,809,043 -$4,854,813 -$8,609,031 -$20,197,564
Mississippi $53,353,470 -$1,519,055 -$5,317,340 -$12,941,451 -$3,527,889 -$6,255,999 -$14,677,139
Missouri $65,007,376 -$1,850,860 -$6,478,797 -$15,768,230 -$4,298,479 -$7,622,486 -$17,883,041
Montana $10,224,981 -$291,121 -$1,019,047 -$2,480,178 -$676,106 -$1,198,937 -$2,812,815
Nebraska $22,988,823 -$654,527 -$2,291,123 -$5,576,183 -$1,520,089 -$2,695,571 -$6,324,053
Nevada $19,424,335 -$553,041 -$1,935,877 -$4,711,579 -$1,284,394 -$2,277,614 -$5,343,488
New Hampshire $14,583,896 -$415,226 -$1,453,467 -$3,537,479 -$964,330 -$1,710,045 -$4,011,920
New Jersey $210,842,860 -$6,003,020 -$21,013,124 -$51,142,177 -$13,941,551 -$24,722,530 -$58,001,286
New Mexico $16,043,242 -$456,776 -$1,598,909 -$3,891,459 -$1,060,826 -$1,881,162 -$4,413,375
New York $1,213,291,672 -$34,544,276 -$120,919,665 -$294,296,793 -$80,226,422 -$142,265,383 -$333,767,422
North Carolina $182,272,191 -$5,189,569 -$18,165,700 -$44,212,058 -$12,052,375 -$21,372,456 -$50,141,710
North Dakota $5,062,947 -$144,150 -$504,586 -$1,228,072 -$334,777 -$593,660 -$1,392,779
Ohio $258,699,664 -$7,365,577 -$25,782,652 -$62,750,354 -$17,105,984 -$30,334,014 -$71,166,334
Oklahoma $47,102,360 -$1,341,076 -$4,694,338 -$11,425,178 -$3,114,547 -$5,523,021 -$12,957,505
Oregon $24,724,567 -$703,946 -$2,464,112 -$5,997,207 -$1,634,861 -$2,899,097 -$6,801,543
Pennsylvania $377,768,888 -$10,755,660 -$37,649,387 -$91,631,860 -$24,979,192 -$44,295,561 -$103,921,382
Rhode Island $42,392,298 -$1,206,974 -$4,224,922 -$10,282,702 -$2,803,104 -$4,970,739 -$11,661,803
South Carolina $68,905,628 -$1,961,849 -$6,867,306 -$16,713,793 -$4,556,243 -$8,079,579 -$18,955,420
South Dakota $4,144,229 -$117,993 -$413,024 -$1,005,227 -$274,029 -$485,935 -$1,140,046
Tennessee $149,794,579 -$4,264,882 -$14,928,900 -$36,334,267 -$9,904,859 -$17,564,270 -$41,207,363
Texas $243,177,927 -$6,923,649 -$24,235,717 -$58,985,391 -$16,079,641 -$28,514,002 -$66,896,421
Utah $7,022,069 -$199,929 -$699,837 -$1,703,277 -$464,320 -$823,378 -$1,931,718
Vermont $6,795,214 -$193,470 -$677,228 -$1,648,251 -$449,320 -$796,778 -$1,869,312
Virginia $96,232,506 -$2,739,887 -$9,590,771 -$23,342,217 -$6,363,177 -$11,283,811 -$26,472,839
Washington $63,009,141 -$1,793,967 -$6,279,648 -$15,283,537 -$4,166,350 -$7,388,182 -$17,333,341
West Virginia $24,465,553 -$696,572 -$2,438,298 -$5,934,380 -$1,617,734 -$2,868,726 -$6,730,290
Wisconsin $34,605,354 -$985,268 -$3,448,856 -$8,393,897 -$2,288,208 -$4,057,676 -$9,519,673
Wyoming $2,441,514 -$69,514 -$243,327 -$592,215 -$161,440 -$286,281 -$671,642
U.S. Territories $336,788,131 -$9,588,875 -$33,565,143 -$81,691,541 -$22,269,424 -$39,490,333 -$92,647,884
Total $5.8 billion -$166 million -$582 million -$1.4 billion -$386 million -$684 million -$1.6 billion

 

Table 2c:
Estimated Cuts in Public Housing and Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance in 2021 under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State Public Housing Section 8 Project-Based Rental Assistance
2012
Number of Units
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) 2012
Number of Units
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama 39,760 -2,629 -4,662 -10,938 16,695 -1,104 -1,958 -4,593
Alaska 1,258 -83 -148 -346 1,289 -85 -151 -355
Arizona 6,526 -432 -765 -1,795 8,083 -534 -948 -2,224
Arkansas 14,148 -936 -1,659 -3,892 10,781 -713 -1,264 -2,966
California 37,587 -2,485 -4,407 -10,340 101,545 -6,714 -11,907 -27,934
Colorado 8,130 -538 -953 -2,237 16,165 -1,069 -1,895 -4,447
Connecticut 15,718 -1,039 -1,843 -4,324 23,673 -1,565 -2,776 -6,512
Delaware 2,448 -162 -287 -673 4,658 -308 -546 -1,281
District of Columbia 8,196 -542 -961 -2,255 10,550 -698 -1,237 -2,902
Florida 35,057 -2,318 -4,111 -9,644 42,273 -2,795 -4,957 -11,629
Georgia 42,034 -2,779 -4,929 -11,563 27,358 -1,809 -3,208 -7,526
Hawaii 5,323 -352 -624 -1,464 3,178 -210 -373 -874
Idaho 828 -55 -97 -228 3,750 -248 -440 -1,032
Illinois 54,333 -3,593 -6,371 -14,947 61,287 -4,052 -7,186 -16,860
Indiana 16,053 -1,061 -1,882 -4,416 29,827 -1,972 -3,497 -8,205
Iowa 4,035 -267 -473 -1,110 12,100 -800 -1,419 -3,329
Kansas 9,009 -596 -1,056 -2,478 11,568 -765 -1,356 -3,182
Kentucky 22,797 -1,507 -2,673 -6,271 23,290 -1,540 -2,731 -6,407
Louisiana 21,791 -1,441 -2,555 -5,995 15,903 -1,052 -1,865 -4,375
Maine 4,053 -268 -475 -1,115 8,182 -541 -959 -2,251
Maryland 19,179 -1,268 -2,249 -5,276 24,135 -1,596 -2,830 -6,639
Massachusetts 35,403 -2,341 -4,151 -9,739 57,401 -3,796 -6,731 -15,791
Michigan 23,474 -1,552 -2,752 -6,458 54,741 -3,620 -6,419 -15,059
Minnesota 20,990 -1,388 -2,461 -5,774 30,473 -2,015 -3,573 -8,383
Mississippi 13,297 -879 -1,559 -3,658 17,262 -1,141 -2,024 -4,749
Missouri 17,443 -1,153 -2,045 -4,798 25,119 -1,661 -2,945 -6,910
Montana 1,994 -132 -234 -549 4,292 -284 -503 -1,181
Nebraska 7,242 -479 -849 -1,992 6,470 -428 -759 -1,780
Nevada 3,709 -245 -435 -1,020 3,218 -213 -377 -885
New Hampshire 4,100 -271 -481 -1,128 5,868 -388 -688 -1,614
New Jersey 39,681 -2,624 -4,653 -10,916 44,219 -2,924 -5,185 -12,164
New Mexico 4,468 -295 -524 -1,229 5,304 -351 -622 -1,459
New York 231,673 -15,319 -27,165 -63,732 103,755 -6,861 -12,166 -28,542
North Carolina 35,821 -2,369 -4,200 -9,854 25,513 -1,687 -2,992 -7,018
North Dakota 1,809 -120 -212 -498 3,233 -214 -379 -889
Ohio 44,942 -2,972 -5,270 -12,363 74,086 -4,899 -8,687 -20,381
Oklahoma 12,961 -857 -1,520 -3,565 13,421 -887 -1,574 -3,692
Oregon 5,666 -375 -664 -1,559 9,802 -648 -1,149 -2,696
Pennsylvania 64,006 -4,232 -7,505 -17,608 60,174 -3,979 -7,056 -16,553
Rhode Island 9,469 -626 -1,110 -2,605 15,517 -1,026 -1,819 -4,269
South Carolina 15,154 -1,002 -1,777 -4,169 17,992 -1,190 -2,110 -4,949
South Dakota 1,647 -109 -193 -453 5,445 -360 -638 -1,498
Tennessee 34,610 -2,289 -4,058 -9,521 31,950 -2,113 -3,746 -8,789
Texas 54,530 -3,606 -6,394 -15,001 50,918 -3,367 -5,970 -14,007
Utah 1,759 -116 -206 -484 4,117 -272 -483 -1,133
Vermont 1,798 -119 -211 -495 3,496 -231 -410 -962
Virginia 19,540 -1,292 -2,291 -5,375 29,530 -1,953 -3,463 -8,123
Washington 14,658 -969 -1,719 -4,032 16,010 -1,059 -1,877 -4,404
West Virginia 6,507 -430 -763 -1,790 10,956 -724 -1,285 -3,014
Wisconsin 12,440 -823 -1,459 -3,422 31,448 -2,079 -3,687 -8,651
Wyoming 714 -47 -84 -196 2,216 -147 -260 -610
U.S. Territories 59,109 -3,908 -6,931 -16,260 20,535 -1,358 -2,408 -5,649
Total 1,168,877 -77,290 -137,058 -321,549 1,240,771 -82,043 -145,487 -341,327

 

Table 2d:
Estimated Cuts in HOME Grants under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State 2012 actual 2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama $13,800,040 -$392,908 -$1,375,346 -$3,347,346 -$912,499 -$1,618,134 -$3,796,287
Alaska $3,628,693 -$103,314 -$361,645 -$880,178 -$239,940 -$425,485 -$998,226
Arizona $15,226,793 -$433,530 -$1,517,540 -$3,693,421 -$1,006,840 -$1,785,429 -$4,188,776
Arkansas $9,179,710 -$261,360 -$914,873 -$2,226,636 -$606,989 -$1,076,373 -$2,525,269
California $131,050,655 -$3,731,213 -$13,060,834 -$31,787,729 -$8,665,456 -$15,366,438 -$36,051,050
Colorado $12,988,108 -$369,791 -$1,294,427 -$3,150,404 -$858,812 -$1,522,930 -$3,572,931
Connecticut $11,467,021 -$326,484 -$1,142,832 -$2,781,448 -$758,233 -$1,344,574 -$3,154,491
Delaware $4,142,103 -$117,932 -$412,812 -$1,004,711 -$273,888 -$485,685 -$1,139,461
District of Columbia $4,343,097 -$123,655 -$432,844 -$1,053,464 -$287,178 -$509,253 -$1,194,753
Florida $47,858,026 -$1,362,591 -$4,769,650 -$11,608,473 -$3,164,514 -$5,611,627 -$13,165,383
Georgia $25,827,065 -$735,336 -$2,573,990 -$6,264,629 -$1,707,762 -$3,028,371 -$7,104,832
Hawaii $5,571,482 -$158,629 -$555,268 -$1,351,422 -$368,403 -$653,288 -$1,532,673
Idaho $3,976,218 -$113,209 -$396,280 -$964,474 -$262,919 -$466,234 -$1,093,828
Illinois $43,593,785 -$1,241,182 -$4,344,665 -$10,574,136 -$2,882,550 -$5,111,620 -$11,992,323
Indiana $19,506,227 -$555,372 -$1,944,039 -$4,731,443 -$1,289,809 -$2,287,217 -$5,366,016
Iowa $8,817,328 -$251,043 -$878,757 -$2,138,737 -$583,028 -$1,033,882 -$2,425,581
Kansas $8,114,471 -$231,031 -$808,708 -$1,968,251 -$536,553 -$951,468 -$2,232,230
Kentucky $14,055,736 -$400,188 -$1,400,830 -$3,409,368 -$929,407 -$1,648,115 -$3,866,627
Louisiana $14,605,721 -$415,847 -$1,455,642 -$3,542,773 -$965,773 -$1,712,604 -$4,017,924
Maine $4,708,728 -$134,065 -$469,284 -$1,142,152 -$311,355 -$552,125 -$1,295,336
Maryland $12,899,979 -$367,282 -$1,285,644 -$3,129,027 -$852,985 -$1,512,596 -$3,548,687
Massachusetts $25,171,557 -$716,673 -$2,508,660 -$6,105,629 -$1,664,418 -$2,951,509 -$6,924,506
Michigan $30,838,799 -$878,028 -$3,073,471 -$7,480,279 -$2,039,152 -$3,616,025 -$8,483,522
Minnesota $13,486,827 -$383,991 -$1,344,131 -$3,271,373 -$891,789 -$1,581,408 -$3,710,125
Mississippi $9,472,960 -$269,710 -$944,099 -$2,297,767 -$626,380 -$1,110,759 -$2,605,940
Missouri $18,430,106 -$524,733 -$1,836,790 -$4,470,418 -$1,218,653 -$2,161,035 -$5,069,984
Montana $3,890,397 -$110,766 -$387,727 -$943,657 -$257,245 -$456,171 -$1,070,219
Nebraska $5,583,112 -$158,960 -$556,427 -$1,354,243 -$369,172 -$654,652 -$1,535,872
Nevada $8,515,508 -$242,450 -$848,677 -$2,065,527 -$563,070 -$998,492 -$2,342,552
New Hampshire $3,782,193 -$107,685 -$376,943 -$917,411 -$250,090 -$443,484 -$1,040,453
New Jersey $25,676,951 -$731,062 -$2,559,029 -$6,228,217 -$1,697,836 -$3,010,769 -$7,063,536
New Mexico $5,682,237 -$161,782 -$566,306 -$1,378,287 -$375,726 -$666,275 -$1,563,141
New York $100,863,556 -$2,871,740 -$10,052,313 -$24,465,528 -$6,669,396 -$11,826,828 -$27,746,806
North Carolina $25,894,752 -$737,263 -$2,580,735 -$6,281,047 -$1,712,237 -$3,036,308 -$7,123,452
North Dakota $3,421,865 -$97,426 -$341,032 -$830,010 -$226,264 -$401,233 -$941,329
Ohio $40,793,446 -$1,161,452 -$4,065,576 -$9,894,884 -$2,697,383 -$4,783,265 -$11,221,970
Oklahoma $11,137,072 -$317,090 -$1,109,948 -$2,701,415 -$736,416 -$1,305,885 -$3,063,725
Oregon $12,885,177 -$366,861 -$1,284,169 -$3,125,437 -$852,006 -$1,510,861 -$3,544,615
Pennsylvania $42,358,448 -$1,206,010 -$4,221,548 -$10,274,492 -$2,800,865 -$4,966,770 -$11,652,491
Rhode Island $5,113,794 -$145,598 -$509,653 -$1,240,405 -$338,139 -$599,622 -$1,406,766
South Carolina $12,019,586 -$342,216 -$1,197,902 -$2,915,478 -$794,770 -$1,409,365 -$3,306,498
South Dakota $3,373,459 -$96,048 -$336,207 -$818,268 -$223,063 -$395,557 -$928,013
Tennessee $18,163,195 -$517,134 -$1,810,189 -$4,405,676 -$1,201,004 -$2,129,738 -$4,996,558
Texas $67,626,569 -$1,925,432 -$6,739,832 -$16,403,543 -$4,471,668 -$7,929,602 -$18,603,561
Utah $6,312,640 -$179,731 -$629,133 -$1,531,198 -$417,410 -$740,193 -$1,736,560
Vermont $3,340,710 -$95,115 -$332,943 -$810,325 -$220,898 -$391,717 -$919,004
Virginia $18,940,130 -$539,255 -$1,887,620 -$4,594,130 -$1,252,377 -$2,220,838 -$5,210,287
Washington $19,806,562 -$563,923 -$1,973,971 -$4,804,292 -$1,309,668 -$2,322,433 -$5,448,636
West Virginia $6,436,376 -$183,254 -$641,465 -$1,561,211 -$425,592 -$754,702 -$1,770,599
Wisconsin $18,234,014 -$519,150 -$1,817,247 -$4,422,854 -$1,205,687 -$2,138,042 -$5,016,040
Wyoming $3,500,000 -$99,650 -$348,819 -$848,962 -$231,430 -$410,395 -$962,824
U.S. Territories $18,069,960 -$514,479 -$1,800,897 -$4,383,061 -$1,194,839 -$2,118,806 -$4,970,910
Total $1 billion -$29 million -$100 million -$244 million -$66 million -118 million -$276 million

 

Table 2e:
Estimated Cuts in Homeless Assistance Grants under BCA Caps, Sequestration, Ryan
State 2012 actual 2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama $22,258,870 -$633,744 -$2,218,374 -$5,399,126 -$1,471,822 -$2,609,980 -$6,123,248
Alaska $3,954,161 -$112,581 -$394,082 -$959,124 -$261,461 -$463,648 -$1,087,760
Arizona $39,593,590 -$1,127,290 -$3,945,996 -$9,603,846 -$2,618,045 -$4,642,575 -$10,891,899
Arkansas $8,492,503 -$241,795 -$846,384 -$2,059,947 -$561,549 -$995,795 -$2,336,224
California $310,151,984 -$8,830,503 -$30,910,518 -$75,230,661 -$20,508,163 -$36,367,093 -$85,320,480
Colorado $23,129,181 -$658,523 -$2,305,112 -$5,610,229 -$1,529,370 -$2,712,029 -$6,362,664
Connecticut $35,567,628 -$1,012,665 -$3,544,758 -$8,627,306 -$2,351,836 -$4,170,508 -$9,784,387
Delaware $6,030,395 -$171,695 -$601,004 -$1,462,736 -$398,747 -$707,098 -$1,658,916
District of Columbia $21,953,527 -$625,051 -$2,187,943 -$5,325,061 -$1,451,632 -$2,574,177 -$6,039,250
Florida $91,233,624 -$2,597,561 -$9,092,570 -$22,129,685 -$6,032,636 -$10,697,664 -$25,097,684
Georgia $39,903,382 -$1,136,111 -$3,976,870 -$9,678,989 -$2,638,529 -$4,678,900 -$10,977,121
Hawaii $12,776,088 -$363,755 -$1,273,297 -$3,098,976 -$844,793 -$1,498,069 -$3,514,606
Idaho $4,730,200 -$134,676 -$471,423 -$1,147,360 -$312,775 -$554,643 -$1,301,242
Illinois $104,140,457 -$2,965,039 -$10,378,897 -$25,260,375 -$6,886,074 -$12,211,064 -$28,648,257
Indiana $25,441,219 -$724,351 -$2,535,535 -$6,171,038 -$1,682,248 -$2,983,128 -$6,998,688
Iowa $11,664,367 -$332,102 -$1,162,500 -$2,829,316 -$771,282 -$1,367,714 -$3,208,780
Kansas $10,486,035 -$298,554 -$1,045,064 -$2,543,499 -$693,368 -$1,229,548 -$2,884,629
Kentucky $21,975,020 -$625,663 -$2,190,085 -$5,330,275 -$1,453,053 -$2,576,697 -$6,045,163
Louisiana $33,035,205 -$940,563 -$3,292,371 -$8,013,040 -$2,184,385 -$3,873,567 -$9,087,737
Maine $12,100,762 -$344,527 -$1,205,992 -$2,935,168 -$800,138 -$1,418,884 -$3,328,829
Maryland $51,896,356 -$1,477,569 -$5,172,120 -$12,588,013 -$3,431,540 -$6,085,144 -$14,276,298
Massachusetts $73,205,748 -$2,084,280 -$7,295,867 -$17,756,832 -$4,840,580 -$8,583,792 -$20,138,351
Michigan $74,116,802 -$2,110,219 -$7,386,665 -$17,977,818 -$4,900,821 -$8,690,619 -$20,388,975
Minnesota $28,506,049 -$811,611 -$2,840,984 -$6,914,445 -$1,884,904 -$3,342,497 -$7,841,800
Mississippi $8,438,499 -$240,257 -$841,002 -$2,046,848 -$557,978 -$989,462 -$2,321,368
Missouri $32,588,611 -$927,848 -$3,247,862 -$7,904,714 -$2,154,855 -$3,821,201 -$8,964,882
Montana $3,465,582 -$98,670 -$345,389 -$840,614 -$229,154 -$406,359 -$953,356
Nebraska $7,362,608 -$209,625 -$733,776 -$1,785,879 -$486,837 -$863,308 -$2,025,398
Nevada $10,618,372 -$302,321 -$1,058,253 -$2,575,599 -$702,118 -$1,245,065 -$2,921,034
New Hampshire $7,093,149 -$201,953 -$706,921 -$1,720,519 -$469,020 -$831,712 -$1,951,272
New Jersey $46,478,310 -$1,323,309 -$4,632,144 -$11,273,808 -$3,073,283 -$5,449,847 -$12,785,834
New Mexico $10,374,008 -$295,364 -$1,033,899 -$2,516,326 -$685,960 -$1,216,412 -$2,853,812
New York $215,706,769 -$6,141,503 -$21,497,873 -$52,321,970 -$14,263,167 -$25,292,851 -$59,339,311
North Carolina $28,258,057 -$804,550 -$2,816,268 -$6,854,292 -$1,868,506 -$3,313,419 -$7,773,579
North Dakota $2,476,415 -$70,507 -$246,806 -$600,681 -$163,748 -$290,374 -$681,243
Ohio $92,250,086 -$2,626,502 -$9,193,873 -$22,376,239 -$6,099,848 -$10,816,850 -$25,377,305
Oklahoma $9,370,546 -$266,794 -$933,892 -$2,272,926 -$619,608 -$1,098,750 -$2,577,767
Oregon $23,137,403 -$658,757 -$2,305,931 -$5,612,223 -$1,529,913 -$2,712,993 -$6,364,926
Pennsylvania $102,571,574 -$2,920,370 -$10,222,538 -$24,879,826 -$6,782,335 -$12,027,103 -$28,216,669
Rhode Island $7,317,618 -$208,344 -$729,292 -$1,774,966 -$483,862 -$858,033 -$2,013,022
South Carolina $12,439,653 -$354,176 -$1,239,767 -$3,017,370 -$822,547 -$1,458,620 -$3,422,055
South Dakota $2,261,057 -$64,376 -$225,343 -$548,443 -$149,508 -$265,122 -$622,000
Tennessee $23,681,494 -$674,248 -$2,360,157 -$5,744,198 -$1,565,890 -$2,776,791 -$6,514,601
Texas $95,230,049 -$2,711,346 -$9,490,863 -$23,099,061 -$6,296,892 -$11,166,267 -$26,197,071
Utah $8,956,073 -$254,993 -$892,585 -$2,172,391 -$592,202 -$1,050,151 -$2,463,748
Vermont $4,350,369 -$123,862 -$433,569 -$1,055,228 -$287,659 -$510,106 -$1,196,754
Virginia $27,806,301 -$791,688 -$2,771,245 -$6,744,714 -$1,838,635 -$3,260,448 -$7,649,304
Washington $45,638,519 -$1,299,399 -$4,548,448 -$11,070,108 -$3,017,753 -$5,351,377 -$12,554,814
West Virginia $8,027,256 -$228,548 -$800,016 -$1,947,096 -$530,786 -$941,242 -$2,208,238
Wisconsin $28,388,100 -$808,253 -$2,829,229 -$6,885,835 -$1,877,105 -$3,328,667 -$7,809,353
Wyoming $669,908 -$19,073 -$66,765 -$162,493 -$44,296 -$78,551 -$184,287
U.S. Territories $29,052,039 -$827,156 -$2,895,398 -$7,046,881 -$1,921,006 -$3,406,518 -$7,991,998
Total $1.96 billion -$56 million -$195 million -$476 million -$130 million -$230 million -$539 million

 

Table 2f:
Estimated Cuts in Native American Housing Block Grants under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State 2012 actual 2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama $2,015,847 -$57,394 -$200,904 -$488,965 -$133,294 -$236,370 -$554,544
Alaska $99,308,089 -$2,827,454 -$9,897,291 -$24,088,233 -$6,566,544 -$11,644,441 -$27,318,909
Arizona $74,169,100 -$2,111,708 -$7,391,877 -$17,990,504 -$4,904,280 -$8,696,751 -$20,403,362
Arkansas $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
California $45,859,761 -$1,305,698 -$4,570,498 -$11,123,773 -$3,032,383 -$5,377,319 -$12,615,676
Colorado $1,838,640 -$52,349 -$183,243 -$445,982 -$121,576 -$215,591 -$505,796
Connecticut $76,464 -$2,177 -$7,621 -$18,547 -$5,056 -$8,966 -$21,035
Delaware $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
District of Columbia $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Florida $1,422,479 -$40,500 -$141,768 -$345,037 -$94,059 -$166,794 -$391,313
Georgia $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Hawaii $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Idaho $4,870,883 -$138,682 -$485,444 -$1,181,484 -$322,077 -$571,139 -$1,339,943
Illinois $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Indiana $1,062,156 -$30,241 -$105,857 -$257,637 -$70,233 -$124,544 -$292,191
Iowa $1,432,152 -$40,776 -$142,732 -$347,384 -$94,698 -$167,928 -$393,974
Kansas $1,428,692 -$40,677 -$142,387 -$346,544 -$94,469 -$167,522 -$393,022
Kentucky $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Louisiana $588,408 -$16,753 -$58,642 -$142,725 -$38,907 -$68,994 -$161,867
Maine $3,926,247 -$111,786 -$391,300 -$952,353 -$259,615 -$460,375 -$1,080,081
Maryland $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Massachusetts $1,128,094 -$32,119 -$112,429 -$273,631 -$74,593 -$132,275 -$310,330
Michigan $12,839,502 -$365,560 -$1,279,617 -$3,114,358 -$848,986 -$1,505,505 -$3,532,051
Minnesota $17,853,406 -$508,314 -$1,779,315 -$4,330,533 -$1,180,520 -$2,093,414 -$4,911,338
Mississippi $3,030,375 -$86,279 -$302,015 -$735,050 -$200,377 -$355,329 -$833,633
Missouri $281,587 -$8,017 -$28,064 -$68,302 -$18,619 -$33,018 -$77,462
Montana $29,241,598 -$832,553 -$2,914,290 -$7,092,860 -$1,933,541 -$3,428,744 -$8,044,144
Nebraska $7,946,793 -$226,257 -$791,997 -$1,927,579 -$525,465 -$931,807 -$2,186,103
Nevada $14,757,408 -$420,166 -$1,470,760 -$3,579,566 -$975,803 -$1,730,390 -$4,059,652
New Hampshire $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
New Jersey $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
New Mexico $74,063,814 -$2,108,710 -$7,381,384 -$17,964,965 -$4,897,318 -$8,684,405 -$20,374,399
New York $6,182,289 -$176,019 -$616,142 -$1,499,580 -$408,791 -$724,909 -$1,700,701
North Carolina $17,695,091 -$503,806 -$1,763,537 -$4,292,132 -$1,170,052 -$2,074,851 -$4,867,787
North Dakota $11,296,724 -$321,635 -$1,125,860 -$2,740,140 -$746,973 -$1,324,605 -$3,107,644
Ohio $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Oklahoma $95,468,551 -$2,718,136 -$9,514,633 -$23,156,912 -$6,312,662 -$11,194,233 -$26,262,681
Oregon $17,026,758 -$484,778 -$1,696,929 -$4,130,021 -$1,125,859 -$1,996,485 -$4,683,933
Pennsylvania $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Rhode Island $561,831 -$15,996 -$55,993 -$136,278 -$37,150 -$65,878 -$154,555
South Carolina $1,254,641 -$35,722 -$125,041 -$304,327 -$82,961 -$147,114 -$345,142
South Dakota $33,118,200 -$942,926 -$3,300,642 -$8,033,171 -$2,189,873 -$3,883,298 -$9,110,568
Tennessee $168,354 -$4,793 -$16,779 -$40,836 -$11,132 -$19,740 -$46,313
Texas $1,578,424 -$44,940 -$157,310 -$382,864 -$104,370 -$185,079 -$434,213
Utah $12,617,777 -$359,247 -$1,257,519 -$3,060,576 -$834,325 -$1,479,506 -$3,471,056
Vermont $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Virginia $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Washington $36,696,288 -$1,044,800 -$3,657,243 -$8,901,075 -$2,426,467 -$4,302,849 -$10,094,873
West Virginia $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Wisconsin $21,094,136 -$600,582 -$2,102,294 -$5,116,607 -$1,394,806 -$2,473,408 -$5,802,838
Wyoming $3,724,721 32,791 -$371,215 -$903,471 -$246,290 -$436,745 -$1,024,643
U.S. Territories $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Total $658 million -$19 million -$66 million -$160 million -$43 million -$77 million -$181 million

 

Table 2g:
Estimated Cuts in CDBG Formula Grants under BCA Caps, Sequestration, House (Ryan)
State 2012 actual 2014 2021
BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan) BCA cap BCA sequestration House (Ryan)
Alabama $39,246,037 -$1,117,395 -$3,911,358 -$9,519,543 -$2,595,064 -$4,601,822 -$10,796,290
Alaska $3,843,406 -$109,428 -$383,043 -$932,259 -$254,137 -$450,661 -$1,057,292
Arizona $46,405,177 -$1,321,227 -$4,624,855 -$11,256,069 -$3,068,447 -$5,441,272 -$12,765,715
Arkansas $23,433,880 -$667,199 -$2,335,479 -$5,684,137 -$1,549,517 -$2,747,756 -$6,446,484
California $351,573,471 -$10,009,836 -$35,038,686 -$85,277,883 -$23,247,074 -$41,223,999 -$96,715,220
Colorado $32,933,094 -$937,656 -$3,282,194 -$7,988,272 -$2,177,633 -$3,861,593 -$9,059,647
Connecticut $34,325,990 -$977,314 -$3,421,014 -$8,326,134 -$2,269,736 -$4,024,919 -$9,442,822
Delaware $6,233,818 -$177,486 -$621,278 -$1,512,079 -$412,198 -$730,951 -$1,714,876
District of Columbia $13,904,983 -$395,896 -$1,385,805 -$3,372,801 -$919,438 -$1,630,439 -$3,825,156
Florida $123,354,155 -$3,512,082 -$12,293,782 -$29,920,862 -$8,156,540 -$14,463,980 -$33,933,801
Georgia $72,331,774 -$2,059,397 -$7,208,764 -$17,544,841 -$4,782,790 -$8,481,314 -$19,897,928
Hawaii $12,204,143 -$347,471 -$1,216,295 -$2,960,245 -$806,974 -$1,431,006 -$3,357,268
Idaho $10,660,286 -$303,515 -$1,062,431 -$2,585,766 -$704,890 -$1,249,979 -$2,932,565
Illinois $146,421,200 -$4,168,836 -$14,592,701 -$35,516,019 -$9,681,801 -$17,168,723 -$40,279,372
Indiana $59,842,592 -$1,703,810 -$5,964,062 -$14,515,457 -$3,956,969 -$7,016,886 -$16,462,247
Iowa $32,857,042 -$935,490 -$3,274,615 -$7,969,825 -$2,172,604 -$3,852,676 -$9,038,725
Kansas $23,399,317 -$666,214 -$2,332,034 -$5,675,753 -$1,547,232 -$2,743,704 -$6,436,976
Kentucky $38,294,674 -$1,090,308 -$3,816,542 -$9,288,780 -$2,532,157 -$4,490,269 -$10,534,577
Louisiana $45,354,000 -$1,291,298 -$4,520,092 -$11,001,095 -$2,998,940 -$5,318,016 -$12,476,545
Maine $16,106,214 -$458,569 -$1,605,185 -$3,906,733 -$1,064,990 -$1,888,546 -$4,430,698
Maryland $42,440,741 -$1,208,353 -$4,229,750 -$10,294,453 -$2,806,307 -$4,976,419 -$11,675,129
Massachusetts $88,974,486 -$2,533,240 -$8,867,419 -$21,581,707 -$5,883,255 -$10,432,767 -$24,476,213
Michigan $111,620,816 -$3,178,016 -$11,124,408 -$27,074,815 -$7,380,697 -$13,088,179 -$30,706,048
Minnesota $47,038,219 -$1,339,250 -$4,687,946 -$11,409,620 -$3,110,306 -$5,515,500 -$12,939,861
Mississippi $27,513,192 -$783,343 -$2,742,033 -$6,673,617 -$1,819,253 -$3,226,079 -$7,568,672
Missouri $56,650,547 -$1,612,928 -$5,645,934 -$13,741,192 -$3,745,901 -$6,642,600 -$15,584,140
Montana $7,347,866 -$209,205 -$732,307 -$1,782,303 -$485,863 -$861,579 -$2,021,343
Nebraska $16,398,847 -$466,900 -$1,634,350 -$3,977,715 -$1,084,340 -$1,922,859 -$4,511,200
Nevada $17,633,337 -$502,048 -$1,757,382 -$4,277,153 -$1,165,968 -$2,067,610 -$4,850,799
New Hampshire $10,831,576 -$308,392 -$1,079,502 -$2,627,314 -$716,216 -$1,270,064 -$2,979,685
New Jersey $77,708,633 -$2,212,484 -$7,744,636 -$18,849,055 -$5,138,324 -$9,111,781 -$21,377,061
New Mexico $14,165,369 -$403,310 -$1,411,756 -$3,435,961 -$936,656 -$1,660,970 -$3,896,787
New York $281,664,304 -$8,019,415 -$28,071,365 -$68,320,671 -$18,624,474 -$33,026,749 -$77,483,734
North Carolina $65,385,998 -$1,861,640 -$6,516,531 -$15,860,069 -$4,323,515 -$7,666,882 -$17,987,197
North Dakota $4,925,059 -$140,224 -$490,844 -$1,194,625 -$325,659 -$577,491 -$1,354,847
Ohio $135,321,183 -$3,852,802 -$13,486,446 -$32,823,591 -$8,947,835 -$15,867,182 -$37,225,841
Oklahoma $24,942,864 -$710,162 -$2,485,868 -$6,050,157 -$1,649,296 -$2,924,693 -$6,861,594
Oregon $30,258,808 -$861,515 -$3,015,668 -$7,339,596 -$2,000,802 -$3,548,018 -$8,323,971
Pennsylvania $167,973,974 -$4,782,477 -$16,740,704 -$40,743,873 -$11,106,934 -$19,695,908 -$46,208,378
Rhode Island $14,662,008 -$417,450 -$1,461,252 -$3,556,426 -$969,495 -$1,719,204 -$4,033,408
South Carolina $32,602,287 -$928,237 -$3,249,225 -$7,908,031 -$2,155,759 -$3,822,804 -$8,968,644
South Dakota $6,552,541 -$186,561 -$653,043 -$1,589,388 -$433,273 -$768,323 -$1,802,555
Tennessee $44,563,668 -$1,268,796 -$4,441,326 -$10,809,391 -$2,946,681 -$5,225,345 -$12,259,130
Texas $215,435,097 -$6,133,768 -$21,470,797 -$52,256,073 -$14,245,204 -$25,260,996 -$59,264,576
Utah $18,142,062 -$516,532 -$1,808,083 -$4,400,550 -$1,199,607 -$2,127,260 -$4,990,745
Vermont $6,837,137 -$194,664 -$681,406 -$1,658,420 -$452,092 -$801,693 -$1,880,845
Virginia $48,666,534 -$1,385,611 -$4,850,228 -$11,804,585 -$3,217,975 -$5,706,429 -$13,387,798
Washington $48,830,368 -$1,390,276 -$4,866,556 -$11,844,325 -$3,228,808 -$5,725,640 -$13,432,867
West Virginia $19,137,316 -$544,869 -$1,907,272 -$4,641,959 -$1,265,416 -$2,243,960 -$5,264,532
Wisconsin $54,535,888 -$1,552,720 -$5,435,182 -$13,228,259 -$3,606,074 -$6,394,645 -$15,002,413
Wyoming $3,196,119 -$90,998 -$318,533 -$775,253 -$211,337 -$374,763 -$879,228
U.S. Territories $73,983,925 -$2,106,436 -$7,373,422 -$17,945,587 -$4,892,035 -$8,675,038 -$20,352,422
Total $2.95 billion -$84 million -$294 million -$715 million -$195 million -$346 million -$811 million

 

End notes:

[1] The BCA also sets separate sub-caps for defense and non-defense discretionary programs.  This policy is important because it makes it more difficult for policymakers to lessen or avert reductions in defense funding by further cutting funding for non-defense programs.

[2] Richard Kogan, Congress Has Cut Discretionary Funding by $1.5 Trillion Over Ten Years, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, September 25, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3840.

[3] All figures are stated in 2012 dollars.  The methods and sources used are explained in the appendix.

[4] “Discretionary” programs are those that Congress funds annually through appropriations, and they include most housing assistance and community development programs.

[5] “Housing assistance” is a standard federal budget category that includes the Housing Choice Voucher, Section 8 project-based rental assistance, public housing, homeless assistance, HOME, elderly and disabled housing programs, as well as various USDA housing programs.  Most of the funding in the “Community Development” category is for CDBG formula grants, but it also includes a number of smaller HUD and USDA programs.

[6] For fiscal years 2014-2021, the President and Congress can set funding priorities under the BCA caps and protect low-income housing and community development from cuts if they choose, by cutting other programs more steeply.  However, certain other non-defense discretionary programs such as veterans’ health care, bio-medical research, and the FBI are the ones most likely to be shielded, and that will force deeper-than-average reductions in many of the remaining non-defense discretionary programs.  The experience from the 2011 and 2012 funding cycles suggests that low-income housing and community development programs can expect to absorb funding cuts that are at least equal in depth to the cuts that non-defense discretionary programs as a whole will have to bear.

[7] In addition, the analysis ignores the role of FHA mortgage insurance premiums in the HUD budget.  FHA programs now dominate the mortgage market, yet their market share is expected to fall sharply in coming years as the private market continues to recover.  As a result, HUD’s budget may experience declining revenues, forcing the Administration and Congress to provide additional budget authority to sustain program funding levels.

[8] Douglas Rice, Senate Funding Bill Improves on President's Budget Request for Rental Assistance, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, May 22, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3782.

[9] For information on AHSSIA, see the materials available on our web site at: http://www.cbpp.org/research/index.cfm?fa=topic&id=143.

[10] Sequestration also applies to defense and mandatory (“entitlement”) programs.  Most low-income entitlement programs, including Medicaid and SNAP (food stamps), are exempted from sequestration, but the vast majority of low-income housing and community development programs are not.  The only exception is the veterans’ supportive housing program (HUD-VASH).

[11] Richard Kogan, “$2 Trillion in Deficit Savings Would Achieve Key Goal: Stabilizing the Debt Over the Next Decade,” Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, November 1, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3856.

[12] See the following papers from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities: Kelsey Merrick and Jim Horney, “Chairman Ryan Gets 62 Percent of His Huge Budget Cuts from Programs for Lower-Income Americans,” March 23, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3723; Edwin Park and Matt Broaddus, “Ryan Medicaid Block Grant Would Cut Medicaid by One-Third by 2022 and More After That,” March 27, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3727; Dottie Rosenbaum, “Ryan Budget Would Slash SNAP Funding by $134 Billion Over Ten Years,” April 18, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3717; and Michael Leachman et al., “Deficit-Reduction Package That Lacks Significant Revenues Would Shift Very Substantial Costs to States and Localities,” August 8, 2012, http://www.cbpp.org/cms/index.cfm?fa=view&id=3816.

[13] American Housing Survey, 2011, Preliminary Table C10-RO.

 

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