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Posts on Social Security
August 13, 2010

Today’s the final day of our countdown of the top ten facts about Social Security in honor of its 75th anniversary this weekend. We released a report today summarizing all ten.

August 12, 2010

Continuing our countdown of the top ten facts about Social Security in honor of its 75th anniversary this weekend, here are today’s two:

August 11, 2010

Continuing our countdown of the top ten facts about Social Security in honor of its 75th anniversary this weekend, here are today’s two:

August 10, 2010

Continuing our countdown of the top ten facts about Social Security in honor of its 75th anniversary this weekend, here are today’s two:

August 9, 2010

The Social Security program turns 75 this Saturday. Each day this week, we’ll highlight two key facts about the program and its accomplishments since President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Act on August 14, 1935.

August 6, 2010

Listen below to Executive Director Robert Greenstein and Senior Fellow Paul Van de Water discuss the new annual reports, released today, of the Social Security and Medicare trustees.

August 4, 2010

The trustees of the Social Security and Medicare trust funds will release their annual reports tomorrow. Although these reports generally come out by April 15, the trustees often miss that deadline. This year, the trustees delayed the reports to give the actuaries at the Social Security Administration and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services time to incorporate the effects of the Affordable Care Act (the recently enacted health reform legislation).

Here are a few things to anticipate and keep in mind about the reports to come tomorrow:

July 29, 2010

At its meeting yesterday, the President’s Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform discussed imposing a numerical limit on federal spending as a share of the economy. One of the commission’s co-chairs has suggested capping spending and revenues at 21
percent of gross domestic product (GDP), the average spending level over the past 40 years. But as I explain in a new report, averages from the past aren’t a good guide for the future:

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