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More Praise for Job-Creating TANF Emergency Fund

July 6, 2010

“A Jobs Program that Works” is New York Times columnist Bob Herbert’s apt description of the TANF Emergency Fund, which more than 30 states are using to help create private- and public-sector jobs for nearly 200,000 adults and youth. The job market’s continued weakness shows why these programs remain important tools for boosting employment and the overall economy. But as I’ve warned, many states will begin shutting down their programs in the next few weeks unless Congress extends the fund.

Subsidized Jobs Programs Peaking as Expiration Looms

June 23, 2010

I’ve been calling the TANF Emergency Fund the Recovery Act’s best-kept secret, but the secret is out — just ask the nearly 200,000* adults and youth who will get jobs through one of the many subsidized jobs programs the fund supports across the country (see map). The Senate is considering jobs legislation that would extend the fund (which expires September 30) for a year and fully offset the cost. This may be the last chance for congressional action before both the fund and most of those jobs disappear.

“YouCut” Stacks the Deck Against Emergency Fund

May 18, 2010

Given the wildly inaccurate description of the TANF Emergency Fund on the “YouCut” website, the vote to eliminate the program is meaningless. Far from a “backdoor way to undo” welfare reform, the fund has enabled states to expand work-focused programs within TANF despite high unemployment and a weak economy.

The Recovery Act’s Best-Kept Secret, Cont.

May 17, 2010

In an earlier post, I explained that the TANF Emergency Fund is helping to place some 180,000 low-income parents and youth who would otherwise be unemployed into paid jobs in the private and public sectors. The table below lists the estimated number of jobs in most of the 35 states that are operating jobs programs (or are planning to) using the fund.

The Recovery Act’s Best-Kept Secret

May 3, 2010

A little-known component of last year’s Recovery Act is helping to place some 180,000 unemployed individuals in subsidized jobs across the country. But the program — and almost all of those jobs — will disappear soon unless Congress acts.

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