off the charts
POLICY INSIGHT
BEYOND THE NUMBERS

You are here

House Changes to Military Pensions Would Violate Key Principle of Recent Budget Deal

February 12, 2014

The House voted yesterday to undo the military pension savings in December’s Murray-Ryan budget deal and offset the cost by extending the sequestration budget cuts for mandatory programs by one year, from 2023 to 2024.   That was a mistake.  The bill upends a key feature of the agreement, which Congress adopted with a large, bipartisan...

Higher Deficits in New CBO Forecast Don’t Reflect Higher Spending

February 4, 2014

The new Congressional Budget Office (CBO) budget estimates are more pessimistic than those it released last May, showing deficits that are $1 trillion higher over 2014 through 2023.  This worsening budget outlook reflects lower revenues, not higher spending.  In fact, CBO now projects lower spending over the decade than it did last year. ...

Murray-Ryan Deal Will Only Temporarily Halt Non-Defense Funding Slide

December 18, 2013

Update, February 14th, 2014: We've updated this post to reflect new Congressional Budget Office estimates.

The Murray-Ryan budget deal is a step in the right direction, but it provides only a temporary respite from the cuts in non-defense discretionary programs that sequestration requires. ...

Replacing Sequestration With Equivalent Ten-Year Savings Makes Sense

November 20, 2013

Congressional budget negotiators are looking to replace some or all of the “sequestration” budget cuts for 2014 and perhaps 2015 with changes in mandatory programs, fees, or revenues that reduce program costs or raise fees and revenues over the next ten years.  There are good reasons to do so on a one-to-one basis — substituting every $1 of repealed sequestration cuts with $1 of ten-year...

House GOP Proposal Would Cut Non-Defense Well Below Sequestration Level

September 17, 2013

Dozens of House Republicans led by Georgia’s Tom Graves recently introduced a continuing resolution to fund the government in fiscal year 2014 at $967.5 billion.  That total matches the combined defense and non-defense caps for discretionary funding next year under the 2011 Budget Control Act (BCA) if sequestration remains in place.  But, the bill would provide about $44 billion more...

Defense Funding Gimmick: One Part of a Larger Problem

July 23, 2013

The House is scheduled today to consider the 2014 defense appropriations bill, which is at the heart of the House’s misguided approach to addressing the inadequate funding for discretionary programs when the “sequestration” cuts are added to the 2011 Budget Control Act’s (BCA) already austere funding caps.

By itself, the bill exceeds the $498 billion defense cap (after sequestration)...

House Appropriations Plan Leaves Too Little Funding to Go Around

June 5, 2013

The House Appropriations Committee-approved plan to divide up 2014 discretionary funding among the 12 appropriations subcommittees would lead to deep cuts in a broad range of non-defense areas and shift tens of billions of dollars from domestic programs to defense and other security programs, our new analysis explains. ...

Ryan Budget Hits Non-Defense Discretionary Funding Far More Than Sequestration Does

March 14, 2013

House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan’s new budget would cut the part of the budget that supports everything from education and law enforcement to biomedical research to nutrition assistance by more than $1 trillion below the funding caps in the 2011 Budget Control Act (BCA) over the next decade.  That’s hundreds of billions of dollars below the funding levels that would result...

Senate Should Give More Departments — Not Just Defense and Veterans Affairs — Updated Funding Levels

March 7, 2013

The House approved a bill yesterday from Appropriations Committee Chairman Hal Rogers (R-KY) to fund the government for the rest of the fiscal year.  The bill includes full appropriations bills for the Departments of Defense (DoD) and Veterans Affairs (VA), reflecting updated priorities for those departments.  But...

Pages