Health

Conflicting Court Decisions Won’t Affect Federal Marketplace Subsidies

In a unanimous decision, a panel of the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit upheld a lower court decision finding that individuals are eligible for premium subsidies to purchase health insurance through the federal marketplace, just as they can in state-based marketplaces.  In a 2-1 decision that has received considerably more media attention, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals overturned a lower court ruling and ruled that premium subsidies can be used to purchase coverage only through state-run marketplaces, and not through the federal marketplace.  What do these decisions really mean?

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Health Reform’s Medicaid Expansion Is an Even Better Deal for States

CBO has sharply lowered its estimates of the costs to states of adopting the Medicaid expansion.

CBO now estimates that the federal government will, on average, pick up more than 95 percent of the total cost of the Medicaid expansion and other health reform-related costs in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) over the next ten years (2015-2024).

States will spend only 1.6 percent more on Medicaid and CHIP due to health reform than they would have spent without health reform.

Related: Correcting Seven Myths About Medicaid

 

RSC Health Plan: More Uninsured and Underinsured, Fewer Consumer Protections

With House supporters planning a new push for the Republican Study Committee (RSC) health plan, aided by RSC chairman Steve Scalise (R-LA)’s election as House majority whip, it’s worth looking at the plan’s likely impact. Unfortunately, it would substantially expand the ranks of the uninsured and end various important consumer protections.

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Basics

Medicaid is a federal-state public insurance program that provides health coverage to nearly 65 million low-income Americans, including children, parents, seniors, and people with disabilities. The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) gives states matching federal funds to provide health coverage to nearly 8 million children in families whose income is modestly above Medicaid limits, typically up to 200 percent of the poverty line. Medicare is a federal program that provides health coverage to about 47 million Americans, primarily individuals age 65 and older but also including several million younger adults with permanent disabilities. The Affordable Care Act, the health reform law passed in 2010, will help an estimated 32 million uninsured Americans obtain quality, affordable health coverage in both the private and public markets.

Policy Basics:
- Introduction to Medicaid

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The Center works to ensure that federal and state health insurance programs provide coverage that meets the health care needs of low-income children and families, as well as seniors and people with disabilities.  The Center also works to remove barriers preventing eligible families from gaining access to health coverage.

By the Numbers

Rate of Uninsured Fell Again in 2012
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