Poverty and Income

Greenstein Statement on New Census Bureau Data on Poverty, Income Inequality, and Health Insurance

Today’s Census data provide fresh evidence that the economy strengthened in 2013, but too slowly to improve the living standards of many middle- and low-income Americans. Median household income did not rise significantly and remained 8.0 percent (or $4,497) below its level in 2007, before the Great Recession — and 8.6 percent below its level in 2000, before the 2001 recession. The poverty rate fell from 15 percent in 2012 to 14.5 percent, the first statistically significant decline since 2006 (and only the second since 2000). But the rate remained well above its 12.5 percent level in 2007 and even further above its 2000 level of 11.3 percent. At last year’s rate of improvement, we would need to wait until 2018 for it to fall to or below the 2007 pre-recession level, and until 2020 to fall below the 2000 level.

Today’s report, however, does include a substantial and welcome decline in poverty among children. Read more

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Census Data Show Uninsured Rate Fell Slightly in 2013, Continuing Earlier Progress

Some 14.5 percent of Americans were uninsured in 2013, Census figures released today based on the American Community Survey (ACS) show, a slight but statistically significant reduction from 2012’s 14.8 percent and well below the recent high of 15.5 percent in 2010.

More: Poverty and Income Analyses

Federal Budget

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Each year, Congress follows a set of laws and procedures to decide how much money to spend, what to spend it on, and how to raise the money to pay for that spending.

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