February 9, 1999

Employed But Not Insured
Appendices
by Jocelyn Guyer and Cindy Mann

Appendix A:

State-Specific Earnings Thresholds for Working Parents Who Already Are Enrolled in Medicaid

Table 6
How Much Can a Working Parent Already Enrolled in Medicaid
Earn and Still Retain Eligibility for Coverage?

(Based on a 3-person family with one wage earner. Assumes that the family's only source of income is earnings.)

  Monthly
Earnings Threshold
Annual Earnings
Limit Threshold
Earnings as a % of the Federal
Poverty Level
Alabama $253 $3,036 22%
Alaska $1,778 $21,340 125%
Arizona $584 $7,011 51%
Arkansas $637 $7,650 56%
California $1,788 $21,456 157%
Colorado $510 $6,120 45%
Connecticut * $1,138 $13,656 100%
Delaware ** $1,228 $14,730 108%
District of Columbia $2,275 $27,300 200%
Florida $804 $9,648 71%
Georgia $513 $6,156 45%
Hawaii ** $1,309 $15,708 100%
Idaho $406 $4,872 36%
Illinois* $597 $7,164 52%
Indiana $377 $4,524 33%
Iowa $1,063 $12,750 93%
Kansas $762 $9,140 67%
Kentucky $615 $7,380 54%
Louisiana $263 $3,156 23%
Maine $1,227 $14,724 108%
Maryland * $523 $6,276 46%
Massachusetts ** $1,513 $18,156 133%
Michigan $548 $6,576 48%
Minnesota ** $3,128 $37,538 275%
Mississippi $457 $5,484 40%
Missouri $381 $4,572 33%
Montana $833 $10,000 73%
Nebraska * $490 $5,880 43%
Nevada $434 $5,205 38%
New Hampshire $686 $8,235 60%
New Jersey $533 $6,396 47%
New Mexico $702 $8,424 62%
New York $1,067 $12,809 94%
North Carolina $634 $7,608 56%
North Dakota $625 $7,496 55%
Ohio $972 $11,664 85%
Oklahoma $426 $5,112 37%
Oregon ** $1,138 $13,650 100%
Pennsylvania $804 $9,648 71%
Rhode Island $2,194 $26,333 193%
South Carolina $668 $8,016 59%
South Dakota $796 $9,546 70%
Tennessee $766 $9,192 67%
Texas * $364 $4,368 32%
Utah * $657 $7,884 58%
Vermont ** $1,797 $21,564 158%
Virginia $380 $4,560 33%
Washington $1,090 $13,080 96%
West Virginia $342 $4,104 30%
Wisconsin $737 $8,844 65%
Wyoming $789 $9,468 69%
Median state $686 $8,235 60%
Unless otherwise noted, the earnings thresholds presented in this table are based on the income standards and earnings disregards used by states under their family coverage categories to determine the ongoing eligibility of a parent who has been working for 12 months or more. States marked with an "*" have not yet established a family coverage category and base their earnings thresholds on their medically needy eligibility rules. States marked with "**" have expanded coverage to low-income working parents under an 1115 waiver and the table is based on the eligibility rules that apply to parents under the waiver. See Appendices B and C for additional information.

Table 7
How Many Hours Can a Parent Already Enrolled in Medicaid
Work and Still Retain Eligibility for Coverage?

(Based on a 3-person family with one wage earner.
Assumes that the family's only source of income is earnings.)

At a $7 an hour job, can a parent work full time? If no, how many hours a week can the parent work? At the federal minimum wage ($5.15 per hour), can a parent work full time? If no, how many hours can a parent work at $5.15 an hour?
Alabama NO 8 NO 11
Alaska YES YES
Arizona NO 19 NO 26
Arkansas NO 21 NO 29
California YES YES
Colorado NO 17 NO 23
Connecticut * NO 38 YES
Delaware ** YES YES
District of Columbia YES YES
Florida NO 27 NO 36
Georgia NO 17 NO 23
Hawaii ** YES YES
Idaho NO 13 NO 18
Illinois* NO 20 NO 27
Indiana NO 12 NO 17
Iowa NO 35 YES
Kansas NO 25 NO 34
Kentucky NO 20 NO 28
Louisiana NO 9 NO 12
Maine YES YES
Maryland * NO 17 NO 23
Massachusetts ** YES YES
Michigan NO 18 NO 25
Minnesota ** YES YES
Mississippi NO 15 NO 20
Missouri NO 13 NO 17
Montana NO 27 NO 36
Nebraska * NO 16 NO 22
Nevada NO 14 NO 19
New Hampshire NO 23 NO 31
New Jersey NO 18 NO 24
New Mexico NO 23 NO 31
New York NO 35 YES
North Carolina NO 21 NO 28
North Dakota NO 21 NO 28
Ohio NO 32 YES
Oklahoma NO 14 NO 19
Oregon ** NO 38 YES
Pennsylvania NO 27 NO 36
Rhode Island YES YES
South Carolina NO 22 NO 30
South Dakota NO 26 NO 36
Tennessee NO 25 NO 34
Texas * NO 12 NO 16
Utah * NO 22 NO 29
Vermont ** YES YES
Virginia NO 13 NO 17
Washington NO 36 YES
West Virginia NO 11 NO 15
Wisconsin NO 24 NO 33
Wyoming NO 26 NO 35
Median state NO 23 NO 31
Unless otherwise noted, the earnings threshold presented in this table are based on the income standards and earnings disregards used by states under their family coverage categories to determine the ongoing eligibility of a parent who has been working for 12 months or more. States marked with an "*" have not yet established a family coverage category and base their earnings threshold on their medically needy eligibility rules. States marked with "**" have expanded coverage to low-income working parents under an 1115 waiver and the table is based on the eligibility rules that apply to parents under the waiver. See Appendices B and C for additional information. Some states have minimum wage levels that are higher than the federal level.

 

Appendix B:

Methodology Used to Develop Tables with State-Specific Information on Medicaid Eligibility Rules for Parents

This Appendix describes the methodology used to develop the tables in this report that provide state-specific information on Medicaid eligibility rules for parents. It applies to Tables 3 through 5, which appear in the body of the report, as well as to Tables 6 and 7, which appear in Appendix A.

 

General Information

The tables with state-specific information about Medicaid eligibility rules for parents in this report are based on the eligibility rules that apply to a three-person family that is not on welfare and that has one working parent.

Technically, the Medicaid rules described in these tables are used to determine the eligibility of families with children, not just parents. However, since most children also are eligible for Medicaid under other eligibility categories (e.g., poverty level eligibility categories for children) at higher income levels than are presented in these tables, the thresholds and rules noted in these tables relate primarily to parents.

When eligibility rules for income vary within a state, the tables display the rules that apply in the sub-state area with the largest number of Medicaid beneficiaries.

In many states, parents have more than one route to Medicaid eligibility. Unless otherwise specified, the tables display the eligibility rules used under a state's "family coverage" category (i.e., the "delinking" or "section 1931" eligibility category based on a state's July 16, 1996 AFDC income, resource, and family composition rules that replaced the automatic eligibility link between Medicaid and cash welfare when the 1996 federal welfare law was enacted). There are two circumstances under which the information in the tables is not based on the rules that apply to the family coverage category.

 

Background Information on Specific Tables

Tables 3 and 4

Tables 3 and 4 provide information on how much a working parent who applies for Medicaid can earn and still be found eligible for coverage. Table 3 presents the information in terms of dollar limits on earnings and Table 4 presents it in terms of how many hours a week a parent can work. Both tables take into account how states treat a family's earnings when evaluating their application for Medicaid. For example, many states disregard $90 in earnings each month for each wage earner when determining a family's countable income to account for expenses associated with working. Thus, a state that covers a working parent in a three-person family with countable income below $600 a month would extend coverage to a parent with gross earnings of $690 a month ($690 - $90 = $600, the state's countable income threshold of $600 a month). A number of states, however, have adopted significantly more generous disregards of earnings and these are reflected in Tables 3 and 4.

The earnings thresholds presented in these tables do not take into account other possible disregards or deductions a family might receive, the most significant of which is the deduction for child care expenses. A parent who pays out-of-pocket for child care costs is likely to be eligible for Medicaid at somewhat higher gross earnings levels than are presented in the table. At the same time, a parent with income from sources other than earnings may be eligible for Medicaid at lower income levels than those identified in these tables because the parent may not be able to take full advantage of a state's earnings disregard policy.

Note that states generally define a person applying for Medicaid as someone who has not been enrolled in Medicaid in one of the four previous months.

 

Table 5

Tables 5 shows whether or not a state covers two-parent families to the same extent that it covers single-parent families by eliminating the so-called "100-hour" rule. The 100-hour rule, which is a remnant of the old AFDC system, restricts Medicaid coverage to two-parent families in which the principal wage earner works fewer than 100 hours a month. As a result of a regulation issued by the Department of Health and Human Services on August 7, 1998, all states now have the option to effectively drop the 100-hour rule and to provide Medicaid to two-parent families on the same terms that it is available to single-parent families. Even prior to the regulation, a majority of states had statewide waivers that gave them the option to dispense with the 100-hour rule requirement when determining a family's eligibility for Medicaid.

 

Tables 6 and 7

Tables 6 and 7, which appear in Appendix A, display how much a working parent in a three-person family who is enrolled in Medicaid can earn and still retain eligibility for ongoing coverage, with Table 6 presenting the information in terms of a dollar limit and Table 7 presenting it in terms of how many hours a week such a parent can work. They differ from Tables 3 and 4 because they are based on the gross earnings thresholds that relate to parents who already are enrolled in Medicaid and then find a job or have increased earnings, as opposed to working parents who are applying for Medicaid.

As with Tables 3 and 4, Tables 6 and 7 reflect a state's earnings disregard policies, as well as the state's countable income threshold for parents enrolled in Medicaid. They do not take into account other disregards or deductions that parents can receive, and they assume that all income is from earnings.

More specifically, Tables 6 and 7 show the gross earnings eligibility thresholds that apply to a parent already enrolled in Medicaid who has been working for twelve months or more. Parents already enrolled in Medicaid, but who have been working for fewer than twelve months, may be eligible for regular Medicaid at different gross earnings levels than those displayed in Tables 6 and 7 because some states offer Medicaid beneficiaries a different earnings disregard for a time-limited period. For example, many states disregard $30 plus one-third of remaining earnings for the first four months that a parent works.

Also note that Tables 6 and 7 display how much a parent can earn and retain ongoing Medicaid coverage as opposed to time-limited coverage under Transitional Medical Assistance. Under federal law, families who lose their eligibility for regular Medicaid under the family coverage category because of an increase in earnings or the lapse of an earnings disregard policy are eligible for six months of Transitional Medical Assistance and for an additional six months if the family's gross income (less child care expenses) is below 185 percent of the poverty level. (Twelve states have received waivers to extend TMA for longer than 12 months.) States also must provide four months of transitional coverage to a family who loses Medicaid due to child support income.

 

Source of Information

For most states, the information in these tables on Medicaid eligibility rules are based on a survey on the implementation of the Medicaid provisions included in the 1996 federal welfare law conducted by the State Policy Documentation Project, a joint project of the Center for Law and Social Policy and the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Responses to the survey were verified by officials in most states in the fall of 1998. In states for which verified survey results were not available, the Center has confirmed the information included in this table directly with state officials. The only exception is that in Virginia state officials did not verify or comment on the information included in these tables.

Since states continue to examine and revise their coverage of families with children under the family coverage category, it is possible that some of the information in this table may have changed since it was confirmed by state officials in late 1998.

 

Appendix C:

Additional State-Specific Information on Medicaid Eligibility Rules for Parents

These state-specific notes are designed to supplement the tables in this report that provide information about each state's Medicaid eligibility rules for parents (Table 3 - Table 7) by explaining relevant details about a state's coverage of parents. For example, they indicate when a state has an additional route to Medicaid coverage for parents through a medically needy eligibility category or through a continued linkage of Medicaid eligibility to receipt of cash assistance. Throughout this Appendix, the phrase "gross earnings" is used in situations where a state's earnings disregard policies have been taken into account.

Arkansas also has a medically needy eligibility category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $275 per month.

California also has a medically needy eligibility category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $934 per month.

Connecticut has not yet fully implemented the delinking of TANF and Medicaid as of the fall, 1998. As a result, applicants are most likely to be evaluated for Medicaid eligibility under the state's medically needy eligibility rules unless they also are seeking TANF coverage. Once a family is on Medicaid, it remains eligible for coverage as long as it meets medically needy eligibility criteria or TANF income and resource eligibility rules. A working parent in a three-person family receiving TANF retains eligibility for coverage until the parent's gross earnings reach $1,138 per month or 100 percent of the poverty level. As a result, as noted in Tables 6 - 7, once a parent is on Medicaid, she continues to remain eligible for coverage until her gross earnings reach $1,138 per month.

Delaware extends Medicaid to all uninsured adults, including parents, with countable income (gross income less a $90 earnings and other disregards) at or below 100 percent of the poverty level under an 1115 waiver. These are the income thresholds reflected in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. There are some differences in the coverage available to parents under this 1115 waiver versus the coverage available to them if they qualify for regular Medicaid under the state's delinking category. Under the 1115 waiver expansion, an adult must be fully uninsured in order to be eligible and coverage does not start until the adult has enrolled in a managed care plan. In contrast, under the family coverage category, parents can be enrolled in Medicaid if they have insurance from another source and Medicaid will cover services not covered by the private plan. Also, they can receive services on a fee-for-service basis until they are enrolled in a managed care plan. In Delaware, a working parent in a three-person family with no child care expenses who applies for Medicaid is eligible for coverage under the delinking category if her gross earnings fall below $427 per month. Once on Medicaid, she remains eligible for coverage under the delinking category until her gross earnings reach $942 per month.

Hawaii covers parents with gross income up to 100 percent of the poverty level under an 1115 Medicaid waiver, as noted in Tables 3 - 7. The poverty level in Hawaii is set at $1,309 per month, a level that is different from that of other states. Hawaii also has a medically needy eligibility category that covers a family of three with countable income up to $712 a month. It has not established a delinking Medicaid eligibility category.

Illinois has not yet implemented the requirement to delink TANF and Medicaid eligibility and does not have a family coverage category as of the fall, 1998. The state provides Medicaid to non-TANF families with children through its medically needy eligibility category, at the levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. It also provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients. (State law requires that persons receiving TANF also receive Medicaid.) In order to initially qualify for TANF, a three-person family must have gross earnings below $466 per month and to remain on welfare a family must have gross earnings below $1,128 per month.

Indiana also provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients. Under its TANF program, Indiana has established a special "zero-grant" status for families on welfare who increase their earnings to the point that they no longer are eligible for cash benefits, but who nevertheless have income below 100 percent of the poverty level. Families in this zero-grant status are still considered TANF recipients and so, under Indiana rules, are eligible for Medicaid. Thus, some parents with income up to 100 percent of the poverty level are eligible for Medicaid in Indiana, but they are eligible up to this income level only if they recently have received cash welfare benefits and if they are willing to continue to be classified as TANF recipients (and have the TANF time limits continue to run) even after they have stopped receiving cash welfare benefits.

Iowa also has a medically needy eligibility category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $566 per month.

Louisiana also has a medically needy eligibility category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $699 a quarter; this translates into countable income below $233 per month.

Maryland has not yet established a family coverage category as of fall, 1998. Instead it provides coverage to families who are not on cash assistance through its medically needy eligibility category, at the levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. In addition, it provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients. In general, a working single parent with two children is income-eligible for TANF when applying for assistance if her gross earnings fall below $484 a month. She remains income-eligible for TANF (and Medicaid) as long as her gross earnings remain below $523 per month.

Massachusetts covers all families with children with gross income below 133 percent of the poverty level under an 1115 Medicaid waiver; these are the income levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. Some parents, including those who are pregnant, disabled, or working for an employer that offers family coverage that meets specified conditions (e.g., the employer-sponsored coverage must meet benefit and cost-sharing standards, as well as a requirement that the employer cover 50 percent or more of the cost of the coverage) may be eligible for publicly-funded coverage at higher income levels. Also, the state provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients.

Michigan also has a medically needy eligibility category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $532 a month.

Minnesota offers subsidized health care coverage to uninsured parents and other caretaker relatives with gross income at or below 275 percent of the poverty level under "MinnesotaCare," the state's 1115 waiver program. These are the incomes levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. Once enrolled in MinnesotaCare, parents and other caretaker relatives can remain enrolled even if their income exceeds 275 percent of the poverty level if they are willing to pay the full cost of coverage. The parents who are covered as a result of this waiver face some additional restrictions on their eligibility for coverage that do not apply to their counterparts who are eligible under Minnesota's family coverage category. (The delinking category generally covers a parent in a three-person family applying for coverage if the parent has gross earnings of up to $826 per month. As recipients, the family can retain regular coverage under the family coverage category if its gross earnings are at or below $621 per month). To qualify for MinnesotaCare, families cannot have had employer-subsidized health coverage within the last 18 months through their current employer, cannot have had any other type of health coverage within the last four months, and cannot currently have access to employer-subsidized insurance coverage for which the employer covers 50 percent or more of the cost. Adults enrolled in MinnesotaCare also have benefit restrictions and cost-sharing that do not apply to adults enrolled under the state's family coverage category.

Minnesota also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $709 per month.

Mississippi also provides Medicaid to all of its TANF recipients. Since it provides a disregard of 100 percent of earnings for six months to employed TANF recipients, this means that some parents at higher gross earnings levels than noted in Tables 6 - 7 may be able to qualify for Medicaid for a limited period, but only if they also are receiving welfare.

Missouri has received initial approval from HCFA under an 1115 waiver to provide coverage to uninsured custodial parents with countable income at or below 100 percent of the poverty level. Since this waiver is not expected to be implemented until later in February 1999, the new income levels are not reflected in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. Under the 1115 waiver, the state also would cover uninsured non-custodial parents with countable income below 125 percent of the poverty level who are current in paying their child support, as well as uninsured non-custodial parents actively participating in Missouri's Parents' Fair Share program. In order to qualify for coverage under the 1115 waiver expansion, parents must have been uninsured for a period of six months (with some exceptions). Once enrolled in Medicaid as part of an expansion group, parents receive a narrower set of benefits than their counterparts who are covered under the state's delinking Medicaid eligibility category and will have cost-sharing obligations not applicable to their counterparts enrolled in the state's delinking Medicaid eligibility category. Finally, the 1115 waiver will allow Missouri to extend Transitional Medical Assistance for an additional two years to parents who otherwise would be uninsured, assuring that families who lose their ongoing Medicaid eligibility under the state's delinking category may be eligible for up to three years of transitional coverage.

Nebraska has not established a family coverage category as of the fall,1998. Instead it provides coverage to families who are not receiving cash assistance through its medically needy eligibility category at the levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. Due to budgeting rules that breakdown the family unit into as many distinct units as possible and then aggregate the income thresholds for each of these distinct units to create a new family income threshold, parents may be eligible for Medicaid under Nebraska's medically needy category at higher income levels than presented in this report depending on their individual circumstances, including the number of children that they have and the age of their children. In addition, Nebraska provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients. In general, a parent in a three-person family is income-eligible for TANF if her gross earnings fall below $668 a month. A parent who is eligible for TANF can elect to receive only Medicaid, but any months in which the parent receives Medicaid count against the family's TANF time limit.

New Hampshire also provides Medicaid to its TANF recipients who may be eligible for TANF (and, hence Medicaid) at higher gross earnings levels than those noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. In addition, the state has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $652 per month.

New York also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $867 a month.

North Carolina also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $367 a month.

North Dakota also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $505 a month.

Ohio has an earnings disregard for recipients reflected in Tables 6 - 7 that is reduced after 18 months. Under the $90 earnings disregard policy that goes into effect after 18 months, the gross earnings threshold for a working parent in a three-person family is $451 per month.

Oklahoma also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $412 a month.

Oregon covers non-elderly adults, including parents, with gross income below 100 percent of the federal poverty level poverty under an expansion adopted as part of an 1115 Medicaid waiver. This is the income level presented in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. The parents who are covered as a result of the 1115 waiver expansion pay premiums of $6 to $28 a month that are not applicable to their counterparts who are eligible under Oregon's family coverage category. (The delinking category generally covers a working parent in a three-person family if the parent has gross earnings below $808 per month).

Oregon also has a medically needy category that provides Medicaid coverage to a family of three with countable income below $615 a month. In addition, it provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients.

Pennsylvania also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $2,800 over a six-month period; this translates into countable income below $467 per month.

Tennessee also provides Medicaid to all parents who are receiving TANF. Since it has more generous earnings disregard policies under TANF than under its family coverage category, this means that some parents receiving TANF may be able to qualify for Medicaid at a higher gross earnings level than noted in Tables 3 - 4 for a limited period of time.

In addition, a parent who can initially qualify for Medicaid under the state's family coverage category is guaranteed a slot in TennCare, the state's special health insurance program operated under a Medicaid 1115 waiver, when the parent loses eligibility for Medicaid under the delinking category. Premiums are required once the parent's income reaches 100 percent of the poverty level.

Utah also provides Medicaid to all of its TANF recipients who may be eligible for TANF benefits (and, hence, Medicaid) at higher gross earnings levels than the levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7.

Texas has not established a delinking Medicaid eligibility category as of the fall, 1998; instead it provides coverage to families who are not on cash assistance through its medically needy eligibility category at the levels noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. Texas also provides Medicaid to all TANF recipients. Beginning in April of 1999, the state plans to provide Transitional Medicaid Assistance to families with income below TANF limits in the state's medically needy eligibility category whose new or increased earnings or child support causes the family's income to exceed the TANF limits.

Vermont covers most adults, including parents, with countable income below 150 percent of the poverty level under an expansion it enacted as part of an 1115 Medicaid waiver. This is the income level noted in Tables 3 - 4 and Tables 6 - 7. The parents who are covered under this expansion have restrictions on their eligibility for coverage that do not apply to their counterparts who are eligible under Vermont's delinking Medicaid category for families with children. (This regular category generally covers a parent with two children if she has gross earnings below about $997 per month, although this eligibility threshold varies depending on the area of the state in which a family resides). For example, adults covered under the 1115 waiver expansion generally must have resided in the state and have been fully uninsured for at least 12 months before they are eligible for coverage. The benefit package that they receive also is not identical to the package available to regular Medicaid beneficiaries and they pay an enrollment fee of up to $20 and cost-sharing for specific services.

Vermont also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $825 a month.

Virginia also has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $358 a month.

West Virginia has a medically needy category that provides coverage to a family of three with countable income below $290 a month.

Wisconsin received approval from the Health Care Financing Administration on January 22, 1999 to implement "BadgerCare," a program that will expand Medicaid to families with children, including the parents in these families, up to 185 percent of the poverty level under an 1115 waiver. Once enrolled, families will retain eligibility for coverage until their incomes reach 200 percent of the poverty level. The expansion will be financed with a mixture of state funds, premiums from families, federal child health funds and Medicaid funds. Families with income above 150 percent of the poverty level will pay premiums to participate in the program.

 

Appendix D:

Federal Medicaid Matching Rates for Fiscal Year 1999

Table 8

Federal Medicaid Matching
Rates for Fiscal Year 1999

State Federal Medicaid
Matching Rate
Alabama 69.27
Alaska 59.80
American Samoa 50.00
Arizona 65.50
Arkansas 72.96
California 51.55
Colorado 50.59
Connecticut 50.00
Delaware 50.00
District of Columbia 70.00
Florida 55.82
Georgia 60.47
Guam 50.00
Hawaii 50.00
Idaho 69.85
Illinois 50.00
Indiana 61.01
Iowa 63.32
Kansas 60.05
Kentucky 70.53
Louisiana 70.37
Maine 66.40
Maryland 50.00
Massachusetts 50.00
Michigan 52.72
Minnesota 51.50
Mississippi 76.78
Missouri 60.24
Montana 71.73
Nebraska 61.46
Nevada 50.00
New Hampshire 50.00
New Jersey 50.00
New Mexico 72.98
New York 50.00
North Carolina 63.07
North Dakota 69.94
Northern Mariana Islands 50.00
Ohio 58.26
Oklahoma 70.84
Oregon 60.55
Pennsylvania 53.77
Puerto Rico 50.00
Rhode Island 54.05
South Carolina 69.85
South Dakota 68.16
Tennessee 63.09
Texas 62.45
Utah 71.78
Vermont 61.97
Virgin Islands 50.00
Virginia 51.60
Washington 52.50
West Virginia 74.47
Wisconsin 58.85
Wyoming 64.08
Source: Department of Health and Human Services.

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